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Scientists Explore Link Between Mental Health Problems and Contraceptive Use

by Sheela Philomena on November 7, 2012 at 2:22 PM
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 Scientists Explore Link Between Mental Health Problems and Contraceptive Use

Women with depression and stress symptoms are less likely to use contraception consistently, finds study.

Women with depression or stress were also more likely to say they did not use contraception at all in the past week compared to women with less severe symptoms.

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The findings are concerning because, although preventing unplanned pregnancies is important for all women, it may be especially important for women with mental health issues, said study researcher Kelli Stidham Hall.

"Perhaps an unintended pregnancy for these women could make things even worse," said Hall, of the University of Michigan's Population Studies Center.
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Family planning providers should consider mental health symptoms when they council their patients, Hall said.

In addition, women with depression and stress who do not want to become pregnant in the near future may be good candidates for long-acting reversible contraception, such as an IUD - highly effective methods of birth control that women do not need to remember to use everyday or each time they have sex, which may be burdensome for some, Hall said.

Hall and colleagues analysed information 689 non-pregnant women ages 18 and 19 living in Michigan. Participants first answered questions about their mental health. Then, for the next year, they filled out weekly journal entries that included the number of times they had sex in the past week, and whether they used contraception when they had sex.

About 25 percent of women had moderate to severe depression, and 25 percent had moderate to severe stress.

Overall, women used contraception consistently 72 percent of the time. The most common forms of contraception were oral birth control or condoms. For women with depression, the odds of using contraception consistently each week was 47 percent lower than for women with less severe symptoms. For those with stress, the odds of using contraception consistently were 69 percent lower.

Women with depression and stress may have social circumstances, such as unemployment, that interfere with their ability to effectively use contraception, Hall said.

In addition, mental health issues may impair a person's ability to make decisions, Hall said.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the America Public Health Association.

Source: ANI
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