About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Scientists Develop 'Robofish' to Monitor Environmental Contaminants

by Rajashri on September 2, 2009 at 8:45 PM
Font : A-A+

 Scientists Develop 'Robofish' to Monitor Environmental Contaminants

A school of small robotic fish, which are equipped with sensors to monitor oil spills or other environmental contaminants has been developed by MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) scientists in the US.

According to a report in Discovery News, the robofish, made with only handful of parts and a blend of polymers, can wiggle their way through water like trout and tuna.

Advertisement

"The interesting aspect of this research is that we are the first group to tailor different polymers in different parts of the body with different dampening and stiffness properties," said Kamal Youcef-Toumi, a scientist at MIT who, along with Pablo Vildivia Y Alvarado, is developing the robofish.

"We are also looking at using the natural motion and behavior of the fish and replicating those motions," said Youcef-Toumi.

The 18 new robofish have advanced significantly since the original Robotuna was created at MIT in 1994.
Advertisement

Robotuna had more than 2,000 parts, including six motors, encased in its four-foot body.

These new models have less than 10 parts, including one motor, and are between five and eight inches long.

Youcef-Youmi and Vildivia Y Alvarado began developing the five-inch robofish four years ago, modeling their movements on freshwater fish like trout and bass.

These small fish swim mostly by moving the tail, while the rest of the body remains motionless.

Whatever the length or swimming method, all the robofish are encased in a special blend of molded polymers.

The body of the fish is one single piece of material, but each section of the body has a different stiffness, allowing the motion of one actuator to move through the robofish's entire body, propelling it forward.

One actuator allows for limited movement, basically forward and side-to-side. To move up and down and more complex movements will require two additional actuators be installed.

The unibody construction also protects the electrical and mechanical parts inside the robot; some robofish have been swimming for more than four years.

The robofish might mimic real fish, but they can't compete in terms of speed. The maximum speed of the robofish is less than one body length per second.

Some fish can swim up to 10 body lengths per second.

Movement requires energy, and the robofish currently get their power from an attached power cable.

Batteries could be installed to power robofish remotely in streams and bays, where they could be equipped with sensors to detect pollution or cameras to study animals that would be disturbed by the noise caused by propellers.

Source: ANI
RAS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Are Menopause Symptoms Troubling You?: Try these Options
Vaccination  And Counter  Measures Against  Monkeypox
Indian Railways Special Concession on Health Grounds
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Most Popular on Medindia

Daily Calorie Requirements Color Blindness Calculator Iron Intake Calculator How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Diaphragmatic Hernia Drug Interaction Checker Drug - Food Interactions A-Z Drug Brands in India Blood Pressure Calculator Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam)

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use