Medindia
Advertisement

School-based Intervention Programs Better Option Than Antidepressants

by Gopalan on July 26, 2009 at 10:49 PM

 School-based Intervention Programs Better Option Than Antidepressants
School-based intervention programs could be a better option to antidepressants for adolescent boys, Australian research says.

School Counsellor Mark Taylor, a researcher with the University of Queensland, found symptoms of depression could be reduced by teaching students the skills of conflict resolution and positive thinking, as well as encouraging physical exercise.
Advertisement

"Working in a school setting as a counsellor I became concerned about the numbers of students who were being prescribed antidepressants, without what I considered to be enough effort to find out what was going on in the lives of these students," Dr Taylor said.

"I wanted to substantiate that there are viable alternatives to antidepressants which can significantly reduce depressive symptoms."

With the aim of increasing the sense of wellbeing in young adolescent males, Dr Taylor trialed the intervention methods - explanatory style, conflict resolution and physical exercise - with 25 students displaying mild symptoms of depression.
Advertisement

"The explanatory style intervention was designed to teach the students about the connection between their thoughts and feelings and that they were able to challenge their negative thinking to bring about more realistic thinking patterns," Dr Taylor said.

"Teaching the students the skills of assertiveness and conflict resolution was intended to assist them with their peer relationships, and also in the home situation where conflicts also occurred.

"The final intervention was a home-based physical exercise program. Being disciplined enough to complete this exercise program for a month helped to enhance the sense of control over their lives and develops a sense of well-being following the exercise sessions.

"This sense of control is a known protective factor against depressive symptoms."

Each of the interventions was conducted over a one-month period, with eight explanatory style lessons and six conflict resolution training sessions conducted.

Dr Taylor said, by being proactive, schools had the potential to assist students experiencing depression and reduce the need for medical intervention.

"At one level, schools can provide regular physical activity for 20-30 minutes for all students, not just for those students who may choose physical education subjects," he said.

"Students perceived to be at risk can be identified using screening measures, and targeted with programs such as an optimism building program, teaching about explanatory style, so that those who are overly pessimistic can learn to challenge their negative thinking.

"Third, students who appear to have social peer relationship difficulties can be assisted in developing social skills, one of which is learning to deal with conflict situations."



Source: Medindia
GPL
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
Stroop Effect
Plant-Based Diet may Reduce the Risk of COVID-19
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Antidepressants 

Recommended Reading
Adolescent Depression
Adolescent depression is an ailment that occurs during the teenage characterized by persistent ......
Depression Screening Test
Online Depression Screening Test tells if you have mild or chronic depression based on your ......
Beware of Long-term Anti-depressant Use, Says Actor Jim Carrey
Actor Jim Carrey may have grappled with depression during his formative years ,yet he cautions ......

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use