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Risk Of Heart Attack Higher In HIV Infected Adults Suffering From Depression

by Dr. Meenakshy Varier on August 24, 2016 at 8:52 PM
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Risk Of Heart Attack Higher In HIV Infected Adults Suffering From Depression

Among more than 26,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, those with major depressive disorder (MDD) were more likely to experience a heart attack than those without MDD, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology.

With the advent of highly effective antiretroviral therapy and improved survival, people with HIV-infection are living longer and are now at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD).

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There is an urgent need to identify novel risk factors and primary prevention approaches for CVD in HIV. Although depression is prevalent in HIV-infected adults and is associated with future CVD in the general population, its association with CVD events has not been examined in the HIV-infected population.

Matthew S. Freiberg, M.D., M.Sc., of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a study that included 26,144 HIV-infected veterans without CVD at baseline (1998-2003) participating in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Aging Cohort Study from April 2003 through December 2009. At study entry, 4,853 veterans (19%) with major depressive disorder were identified.
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The average age of those with MDD was 47 years and for those without MDD was 48 years. During 5.8 years of follow-up, 490 acute myocardial infarction (AMI; heart attack) events occurred. After adjustment for demographics, CVD risk factors, and HIV-specific factors, the researchers found that HIV-infected adults with MDD had a 30% greater risk for having an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) than did HIV-infected adults without MDD. This elevation in AMI risk was slightly lessened to 25% after further adjustment for other variables, such as hepatitis C infection, kidney disease, alcohol/cocaine abuse or dependence, and hemoglobin levels.

"Our findings raise the possibility that, similar to the general population, MDD may be independently associated with incident atherosclerotic CVD in the HIV-infected population. Considering the dearth of research in this area, future epidemiologic and mechanistic studies that include women and non-VA populations with HIV are needed," the authors write.

Source: Medindia
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