About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Risk Factors for Blood Clots in Pregnant and Postnatal Women Revealed by Study

by Rukmani Krishna on April 5, 2013 at 11:50 PM
Font : A-A+

 Risk Factors for Blood Clots in Pregnant and Postnatal Women Revealed by Study

A study has revealed that women who have suffered a still birth or have medical conditions including varicose veins, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or heart disease are at greater risk of developing dangerous blood clots after giving birth.

The research, led by academics at The University of Nottingham, found that being obese, suffering bleeding during pregnancy or labour and having a premature birth or delivery via caesarean section also increased the risk of a venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Advertisement

Their findings, published in the American Society of Hematology journal Blood, could have important implications for the way in which at-risk women are identified and preventative measures administered.

Epidemiologist Dr Matthew Grainge, in the University's School of Community Health Sciences, who led the study, said: "VTE is a rare but serious complication of pregnancy and childbirth. It affects around one or two pregnancies per 1,000 but, despite this, remains a leading cause of mortality in expectant and new mothers in developed countries."
Advertisement

"Preventative measures for VTE, such as a daily dose of heparin, may not be cost effective or safe and are therefore only recommended for women who are considered high risk. However, there is currently inconsistency and disagreement over the factors which put women in that high-risk category and we hope that this research will provide clinicians with valuable new information."

VTE — such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) — are blood clots that form in a blood vessel and can be potentially life-threatening if the clot breaks off (embolises) and travels to the lung causing a blockage of the arteries of the lung known as pulmonary embolism (PE).

The study used data from GP patient records, hospital discharge forms and medications prescribed by primary healthcare professionals to study pregnancies of women aged between 15 and 44 between January 1995 and July 2009 — totalling almost 400,000 pregnancies.

Researchers identified all women who developed VTE for the first time during their pregnancy, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT), then extracted important key information about the mother from their medical records including their age, body mass index (BMI) and whether they smoked.

In addition, they considered other pregnancy-related factors such as how the baby was delivered, whether it was a stillbirth or premature birth and any associated complications including pre-eclampsia, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Co-existing medical factors including varicose veins, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and heart conditions such as heart disease were also taken into account.

They then used sophisticated data analysis methods to calculate the incident rate ratios to compare the risks of VTE to people without the specified risk factor.

They discovered that the risk of VTE during pregnancy was only marginally higher for women who were aged over 35 years old, had a BMI greater than 25 or who smoked. Medical complications such as pre-existing diabetes, varicose veins and IBD were all associated with greater risk, but not pre-existing high blood pressure.

The risks were much higher for new mothers. Postnatal women with a BMI greater than 30 were four times more likely to develop a VTE, while delivery by caesarean section, multiple previous births (three or more), bleeding in pregnancy and premature birth all doubled the chances of a women developing a VTE.

Perhaps most significantly, women who suffered a still birth were six times more likely to have a VTE.

Dr Grainge added: "Our results may have important implications for the way that preventative measures for VTE are delivered in healthcare settings in developed countries. We believe the strong association between stillbirths and premature births and VTE in particular is a finding of real importance which has received only limited attention to date. They are not currently incorporated in the guidelines for risk assessment for VTE and, if they were, then many cases associated with those risk factors could potentially be prevented."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Thalassemia Breech Presentation and Delivery Pregnancy and Complications Anemia in Pregnancy Iron & Folate Deficiency Anemia In Pregnancy Diet for Anemia in Pregnancy The Magic Feeling of Being A Mother Nocturnal Leg Cramps Blood Clots Thoracic Outlet Syndrome 

Recommended Reading
Ectopic Pregnancy
When the fertilization of the ovum occurs in a place other than the uterus, the condition is called ...
Home Pregnancy Test
A home pregnancy test is a test done to find out if one is pregnant or not in the relative comforts ...
Iron & Folate Deficiency Anemia In Pregnancy
About 95% of the anemia cases are due to iron deficiency....
Pregnancy Exercises and Massages
Nutritious food, rest, exercise and massage are vital for expectant women....
Anemia in Pregnancy
Anemia is the commonest blood disorder that may occur in pregnancy and is usually due to low iron or...
Blood Clots
An abnormal blood clot forms when there is damage to the lining of an artery or stagnation of blood ...
Breech Presentation and Delivery
Breech birth or presentation is delivery of the fetus in a bottom or foot-first position. Causes of ...
Diet for Anemia in Pregnancy
A modified diet rich in Folate, Vitamin B12 and Iron is essential for the rapid rise in hemoglobin ....
Nocturnal Leg Cramps
Nocturnal leg cramps are painful muscle contractions, which occur in the calf, foot or thigh muscles...
Pregnancy and Complications
In-depth guide for expecting mothers to overcome health complications related to early or late pregn...
Thalassemia
Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder passed on through parental genes causing the body to prod...
The Magic Feeling of Being A Mother
Selecting the doctor who will help you in your pregnancy is a very personal decision. ...
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a rare condition that occurs when blood vessels or nerves become c...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use