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Researchers Identify Eco-Friendly Insect Repellents

by Kathy Jones on July 18, 2010 at 1:52 PM
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 Researchers Identify Eco-Friendly Insect Repellents

Researchers have identified two compounds emitted by mosquito predators that make the mosquitoes less inclined to lay eggs in pools of water. The findings could pave the way for new environmental-friendly insect repellents.

Called kairomones, the compounds emitted by insect predators are detected by their prey, and can even trigger adaptations, such a change in body size or armour, that helps protect the prey.

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The findings by Rockefeller University's Joel E. Cohen and colleagues at the University of Haifa in Israel may provide new environmentally friendly tactics for repelling and controlling disease-carrying insects.

Kairomones are produced by an individual of one species and received by an individual of a different species, with the receiving species often benefiting at the expense of the donor.
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Cohen and his Israeli colleagues focused on the interaction between two insect species found in temporary pools of the Mediterranean and the Middle East- larvae of the mosquito C. longiareolata and its predator, the backswimmer N. maculata.

When the arriving female mosquitoes detect a chemical emitted by the backswimmer, they are less likely to lay eggs in that pool.

Cohen and his colleagues identified two chemicals, hydrocarbons called n-heneicosane and n-tricosane, which repelled egg-laying by mosquitoes at the concentrations of those compounds found in nature.

Together, the two chemicals had an additive effect.

Since the mosquitoes can detect the backswimmer's kairomones from above the water's surface, predator-released kairomones can reduce the mosquito's immediate risk of predation, said Cohen.

But they also increase the female mosquito's chance of dying from other causes before she finds a pool safe for her to lay her eggs in.

"That's why we think these chemicals could be a useful part of a strategy to control the population size of mosquitoes. We started this work from very basic curiosity about how food webs and predator-prey interactions work, but we now see unexpected practical applications. These newly identified compounds, and others that remain to be discovered, might be effective in controlling populations of disease-carrying insects. It's far too soon to say, but there's the possibility of an advance in the battle against infectious disease," saod Cohen.

The study has been published in the latest issue of Ecology Letters.

Source: ANI
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