About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Research Finds Ghrelin Receptor Alters Dopamine Signaling

by Kathy Jones on January 26, 2012 at 10:24 PM
Font : A-A+

 Research Finds Ghrelin Receptor Alters Dopamine Signaling

An unexpected molecular partnership within the brain neurons that regulate appetite has been identified in a new research.

The study, published by Cell Press in the January 26 issue of the journal Neuron, resolves a paradox regarding a receptor without its hormone and may lead to more specific therapeutic interventions for obesity and disorders of dopamine signaling.

Advertisement

Ghrelin is an appetite-stimulating hormone produced by the stomach. Although the ghrelin receptor (GHSR1a) is broadly distributed in the brain, ghrelin itself is nearly undetectable there. This intriguing paradox was investigated by Dr. Roy G. Smith, Dr. Andras Kern, and colleagues from The Scripps Research Institute in Florida. "We identified subsets of neurons in the brain that express both GHSR1a and the dopamine receptor subtype-2 (DRD2)," explains Dr. Smith. "Dopamine signaling in the hypothalamus is linked with feeding behavior, and mutations in DRD2 that attenuate dopamine signaling are associated with obesity in humans. We speculated that expression of both receptors in the same neurons might lead to interactions between GHSR1a and DRD2 that modify dopamine signaling."

The researchers showed that when GHSR1a and DRD2 were coexpressed, the receptors physically interacted with one another. Further, the GHSR1a:DRD2 complex was present in native hypothalamic neurons that regulate appetite. When mice were treated with a molecule (cabergoline) that selectively activates DRD2, they exhibited anorexia. Interestingly, the cabergoline-stimulated anorexia did not require ghrelin but was dependent on GHSR1a and the GHSR1a:DRD2 interaction. These findings suggest that in neurons expressing both GHSR1a and DRD2, GHSR1a alters classical DRD2 dopamine signaling.
Advertisement

"Perhaps most importantly, we showed that a GHSR1a-selective antagonist blocks dopamine signaling in neurons with both DRD2 and GHSR1a, which allows neuronal selective fine-tuning of dopamine signaling because neurons expressing DRD2 alone will be unaffected," concludes Dr. Smith. "This provides exciting opportunities for designing next-generation therapeutics with fewer side effects for both obesity and psychiatric disorders associated with abnormal dopamine signaling."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
January is the Thyroid Awareness Month in 2022
Menstrual Disorders
Coffee May Help You Fight Endometrial Cancer
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Fructose - The Toxic Sugar 

Recommended Reading
Diet Guidelines for Healthy Snacking
Due to busy lifestyles, food holds the least amount of importance for many of us. Healthy snacking ....
Low Saturated Fat and Low Cholesterol Diet
To avoid obesity we must consciously control the quantity and the quality of fat that we eat and ......
Fructose - The Toxic Sugar
Sugar in terms of caloric value is similar to starch, but in terms of metabolic effects, it is far d...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)