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Research Delves into Baby Talk and How Babies Make Friends

by Savitha C Muppala on February 21, 2012 at 12:20 AM
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 Research Delves into Baby Talk and How Babies Make Friends

Recent research has pointed out that babies are capable of making jokes and taking care of each other, even though they are too young to talk.

In a unique study offering a baby's eye view of the world, Australian experts strapped cameras to the heads of children less than 18 months old to capture the secret lives of infants.

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The research, designed to find out how well young children cope in daycare, shows babies use sophisticated techniques to make friends, attract attention, manage group situations and even make each other laugh, the Telegraph reported.

The tiny cameras were attached to the side of the heads of the babies with a soft headband or hat, and worn for about 15 minutes at a time.

Charles Sturt University researcher Jennifer Sumsion said that the footage showed the babies "were much more capable at a young age than we had anticipated", which "should reassure parents with children in childcare."
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The research so far has been conducted on babies aged six to 18 months in two childcare centres and nine family day care homes.

Dr Sumsion said that the babies "interact with each other through making eye contact, subtle gestures, reaching out, and even using humour."

"A child less than 12 months old handed a toy to another child then snatched it back at the last minute, and they repeated this several times in a playful manner before he handed the toy over," she said.

"And the footage also showed a new child about the same age starting childcare and others kept coming up and trying to touch her and reassure her, then realised that she was frightened as a result.

"And so the other children found a piece of material to cover and help shelter the new child - which worked well in comforting her," she added.

The study, funded by the Australian Research Council, is supported by Family Day Care Australia and KU Children's Services.

Source: ANI
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