Medindia
Advertisement

Repercussions of a Side Hit to the Head are Concussions, Brain Damage

by Mary Selvaraj on August 1, 2019 at 12:29 PM
Font : A-A+

Repercussions of a Side Hit to the Head are Concussions, Brain Damage

Parts of the brain are prone to concussions following collisions, or a side hit to the head. There is a need to raise awareness of the severe, abiding repercussions of the strong impacts to the head, which are concussions, mild traumatic brain injury, and neurological disorders.

Play contact sports for any length of time and at one point or another you're probably going to have your 'bell rung' by a powerful blow to the head from a hard hit or fall. Rising awareness of the severe, abiding repercussions of strong impacts to the head--concussions, mild traumatic brain injury, neurological disorders--have led scientists to focus on what exactly happens inside a skull during a big hit.

Advertisement


Mehmet Kurt, a mechanical engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology who studies the biomechanics of the brain and the skull at rest and during rapid head movements, has now bioengineered simulations that track how the brain behaves upon impact, reconstructing the inertial stresses and strains that prevail inside a brain that's just been hit hard from the side.

"The brain not only rings, but it has a distinct pattern of ringing when the head is hit from the side and experiences rotational acceleration," said Kurt, whose work may not only have implications for brain injury assessment, but for sports helmet makers in search of measurable parameters that can simply distinguish 'concussion' from 'no concussion' to help the industry set safety standards. The paper appears in the issue of Physical Review Applied.
Advertisement

By analyzing a combination of simulated and human data of brain movement that have led to concussions, Kurt and his group, including Stevens graduate student Javid Abderezaei, digitally reveal that side impacts to the head lead to rotational accelerations that cause mechanical vibrations to concentrate in two brain regions: the corpus collosum, the bridge that links the hemispheres, and the periventricular region, white matter lobes at the brain's root that help speed muscle activation.

Kurt and Abderezaei, with Kaveh Laksari of University of Arizona and Songbai Ji of Worcester Polytechnic Institute, found that the skull's internal geometry and the gelatinous nature of the brain cause these two regions to resonate at certain frequencies and receive more mechanical energy in the form of shearing forces than the rest of the brain. More shear strain presumably yields more tissue and cell damage, particularly since shear, opposing motions tend to deform brain tissue more readily than other biological tissues.

"A hit to the head creates non-linear movement in the brain," said Abderezaei. "That means that small increases in amplitude can lead to unexpectedly big deformations in certain structures."

These non-linear vibrations are not surprising in a complex organ featuring a range of tissue densities. Add in the restraining effects of the tough protective membranes, particularly the falx and the tentorium, that hold the brain in place from both above and below, and certain regions are bound to come off worse in side hits.

Identifying the parts of the brain that are most at hazard in side impacts makes them prime targets for further investigation in quest of insights into concussions and detailed brain behavior in collisions. Such knowledge can't come soon enough more than 300,000 American children and teenagers suffer sports-related concussions every year.

In 2018, Kurt and his colleagues won a Vizzies people's choice award for video showing how the brain moves at rest with every heartbeat.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Gonorrhea
World Alzheimer's Day 2021 - 'Know Dementia, Know Alzheimer's
'Hybrid Immunity' may Help Elude COVID-19 Pandemic
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Coma Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) Acute Coronary Syndrome 

Recommended Reading
Injury from Contact Sports Interrupts Neurogenesis and Memory
Concussions and repetitive impact from high contact sports interrupt neurogenesis in the ......
Contact Sports Can Alter the Brain of Young and Healthy Athletes
People who play contact sports such as football, basket ball, field hockey have a significant ......
MRSA Spread More Likely in College Athletes in Contact Sports
College athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the ......
Concussion and Contact Sports
The December issue of Neurosurgical Focus is dedicated to Concussion: Pathophysiology & Seque...
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a sudden, acute life-threatening condition caused by a dramatic red...
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Find out more about the degenerative disease- Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis....
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Coma
Coma is a deep state of unconsciousness where the affected individual is alive but is not able to re...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use