About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Receptors for Dopamine Protects Against Alcohol-induced Brain Damage

by Savitha C Muppala on February 20, 2012 at 11:53 PM
Font : A-A+

 Receptors for Dopamine Protects Against Alcohol-induced Brain Damage

A new study has revealed that receptors for dopamine can protect against alcohol-induced brain damage.

Brain scans of two strains of mice imbibing significant quantities of alcohol reveal serious shrinkage in some brain regions - but only in mice lacking a particular type of receptor for dopamine.

Advertisement

"This study clearly demonstrates the interplay of genetic and environmental factors in determining the damaging effects of alcohol on the brain, and builds upon our previous findings suggesting a protective role of dopamine D2 receptors against alcohol's addictive effects," said study author Foteini Delis, a neuroanatomist with the Behavioral Neuropharmacology and Neuroimaging Lab at Brookhaven.

"These studies should help us better understand the role of genetic variability in alcoholism and alcohol-induced brain damage in people, and point the way to more effective prevention and treatment strategies," coauthor and Brookhaven/NIAA neuroscientist Peter Thanos stated.
Advertisement

The current study specifically explored how alcohol consumption affects brain volume - overall and region-by-region - in normal mice and a strain of mice that lack the gene for dopamine D2 receptors.

Half of each group drank plain water while the other half drank a 20 percent ethanol solution for six months. Then scientists performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans on all the mice and compared the scans of those drinking alcohol with those from the water drinkers in each group.

The scans showed that chronic alcohol drinking induced significant overall brain atrophy and specific shrinkage of the cerebral cortex and thalamus in the mice that lacked dopamine D2 receptors, but not in mice with normal receptor levels. Mice in both groups drank the same amount of alcohol.

"This pattern of brain damage mimics a unique aspect of brain pathology observed in human alcoholics, so this research extends the validity of using these mice as a model for studying human alcoholism," Thanos said.

In humans, these brain regions are critically important for processing speech, sensory information, and motor signals, and for forming long-term memories. So this research helps explain why alcohol damage can be so widespread and detrimental.

"The fact that only mice that lacked dopamine D2 receptors experienced brain damage in this study suggests that DRD2 may be protective against brain atrophy from chronic alcohol exposure," Thanos said.

"Conversely, the findings imply that lower-than-normal levels of DRD2 may make individuals more vulnerable to the damaging effects of alcohol."

"The increased addictive liability and the potentially devastating increased susceptibility to alcohol toxicity resulting from low DRD2 levels make it clear that the dopamine system is an important target for further research in the search for better understanding and treatment of alcoholism," Thanos added.

The study has been published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Baldness can be Cured and Prevented: let us see How!
Drinking Beer or Wine Every Day Could Cause Age-related Diseases
Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Noscaphene (Noscapine) Accident and Trauma Care Drug - Food Interactions Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Blood Pressure Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Vent Forte (Theophylline)
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use