About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Rapid Tests to Diagnose Serious Infections in Children

by Julia Samuel on October 6, 2016 at 4:14 PM
Font : A-A+

Rapid Tests to Diagnose Serious Infections in Children

General practitioners can now detect serious infections in children by just using a simple decision rule and a finger prick, suggests a recent study conducted at the University of Leuven, Belgium. The procedure also prevents unnecessary hospital referrals for less serious cases.

Researcher Jan Verbakel said, "Conventional testing is often complex, expensive and most of all time-consuming. But recently, various so-called point-of-care tests have become available. These simple diagnostic tests can be performed in the general practitioner's office and provide results within minutes."

Advertisement


For the detection of serious infections, point-of-care CRP testing by means of a finger prick holds potential. The test measures the level of the C-reactive protein (CRP) in a drop of blood. The concentration of this protein increases in response to a pathogen. Serious infections such as meningitis, pneumonia, kidney or bone infections or dangerous inflammations of the skin have symptoms that resemble those of more common viral infections.

"As a result, serious infections tend to stay off the general practitioner's radar for too long. We asked ourselves how rapid diagnostic tests might help solve this problem," he said. A one-year study involving over 3,100 ill children showed that 5 mg of CRP per litre of blood is a good threshold value to rule out serious infections but only after the practitioner has performed a clinical evaluation of the patient's symptoms and vital functions.
Advertisement

"Point-of-care CRP testing cannot replace a general practitioner. Does the GP sense that something is off? Is the child short of breath, or running a fever of more than 40°C? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, it's useful to perform a point-of-care CRP test," said Verbakel.

Adding, "Our study showed that with this procedure, all serious infections were detected during the first visit to the general practitioner. But there's no need to test all ill children. Thanks to the combination of a clinical examination of the patient, possibly followed by a point-of-care CRP test, general practitioners can detect serious infections more quickly and more objectively. And for children who are less seriously ill, the procedure prevents unnecessary hospital referrals and anxiety. The point-of-care CRP test is a valuable tool for general practitioners, but it has to be used responsibly," he concludes.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge on Kidney
World Disability Day 2022 - The Role of Innovative Transformation
Diet and Oral Health: The Sugary Connection May Become Sour
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Height and Weight-Kids 

Most Popular on Medindia

Daily Calorie Requirements Drug Interaction Checker Blood - Sugar Chart Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Color Blindness Calculator Post-Nasal Drip Blood Donation - Recipients Hearing Loss Calculator Sanatogen Indian Medical Journals
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Rapid Tests to Diagnose Serious Infections in Children Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests