About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Puzzle of Proteins Linked to Heart Failure Solved by Researchers

by Kathy Jones on February 24, 2012 at 8:36 PM
Font : A-A+

 Puzzle of Proteins Linked to Heart Failure Solved by Researchers

Patients with heart failure have a high risk of sudden death because the calcium inside their heart cells is not properly controlled.

New findings published in PLoS ONE, which reveal mechanisms that underlie this life-threatening risk, provide new possibilities for fighting it.

Advertisement

The study, led by researchers from the University of Bristol's School of Physiology and Pharmacology, show how two individual but very similar proteins cooperatively adjust the amount of calcium inside the heart cells, and how this dual regulation may degenerate in heart failure.

In the heart cells of healthy people, calcium is released from intracellular stores and causes the heart to beat strongly so that it can pump blood around the body. The intracellular stores of calcium are released through specialised gates called 'ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels' in a controlled manner at appropriate times and in suitable quantities. In patients with heart failure, release of intracellular calcium can become irregular and less tightly controlled resulting in an abnormal heart rhythm.
Advertisement

By removing individual RyR channels from heart cells and incorporating them into artificial membranes, the researchers were able to measure the tiny calcium currents that flow through a single channel molecule.

The team discovered that two individual proteins, called FKBP12 and FKBP12.6, bind tightly to the RyR channels and alter the amount of calcium that flows through them.

Their study shows that although FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 are almost identical, the proteins have very different functions. FKBP12 increases calcium fluxes through RyR channels while FKBP12.6 blocks the effects of FKBP12. It seems that this dual regulation by the two proteins may be damaged in heart failure.

Dr Rebecca Sitsapesan at the University, said: "Diseases of the heart and circulatory systems are the main cause of death in the UK and account for almost 191,000 deaths each year — one in three deaths1. These new findings are important because we can use this information to help develop new treatments for patients with heart disease to reduce the risks of sudden cardiac death."
Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Get Involved and Stand Up for Human Rights on Human Rights Day 2022
Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting
Macronutrients Calculator for Weight Loss
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Congenital Heart Disease Heart Healthy Heart Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Statins Mitral Valve Prolapse Aortic Valve Stenosis Infective Endocarditis Magical Millets for Your Health Baby Food - Basics 

Most Popular on Medindia

Drug - Food Interactions Indian Medical Journals Blood Donation - Recipients Iron Intake Calculator Drug Side Effects Calculator The Essence of Yoga Color Blindness Calculator Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Blood Pressure Calculator A-Z Drug Brands in India
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Puzzle of Proteins Linked to Heart Failure Solved by Researchers Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests