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Promising Research on Prosthetic Limbs

by Rajashri on October 20, 2009 at 8:34 PM
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 Promising Research on Prosthetic Limbs

New research from Tel Aviv University may make it possible for amputated or lost limbs to grow back on their own in much the same manner as the proverbial lizard's tail.

Prof. Meital Zilberman of TAU's Department of Biomedical Engineering has developed a new biologically active "scaffold" made from soluble fibers, which may help humans replace lost or missing bone. With more research, she says, it could also serve as the basic technology for regenerating other types of human tissues, including muscle, arteries, and skin.

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"The bioactive agents that spur bone and tissue to regenerate are available to us. The problem is that no technology has been able to effectively deliver them to the tissue surrounding that missing bone," says Prof. Zilberman. Her artificial and flexible scaffolding connects tissues together as it releases growth-stimulating drugs to the place where new bone or tissue is needed ― like the scaffolding that surrounds an existing building when additions to that building are made.

Scientific peer-reviewed research on this scaffold fiber has appeared in a number of journals, including Acta Biomaterialia, and is currently being licensed through Ramot, TAU's technology transfer company.
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Active implants

The invention, which does not yet have a name, could be used to restore missing bone in a limb lost in an accident, or repair receded jawbones necessary to secure dental implants, says Prof. Zilberman. The scaffold can be shaped so the bone will grow into the proper form. After a period of time, the fibers can be programmed to dissolve, leaving no trace.

Her technology also has potential uses in cosmetic surgery. Instead of silicon implants to square the chin or raise cheekbones, the technology can be used to "grow your own" cheekbones or puffy lips. But Prof. Zilberman says it's far too early to think of such uses. She first started her work in biomaterials at the UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Texas, and currently is concentrating on various medical applications. One of them intends to make dental implants more effective. She envisions applying the invention to organ tissue regeneration in the future.



Source: Eurekalert
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