Probiotics and Xylitol Found Ineffective for Pharyngitis

by Chrisy Ngilneii on  December 18, 2017 at 12:21 PM Respiratory Disease News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

The use of probiotics and xylitol chewing gum to alleviate sore throat symptoms, as an alternative to antibiotics, appears to have no effect.
Probiotics and Xylitol Found Ineffective for Pharyngitis
Probiotics and Xylitol Found Ineffective for Pharyngitis

"Simple over-the-counter treatments could potentially limit the effects of both bacterial and viral infections and help patients to manage symptoms," says Dr. Paul Little, Primary Care Group, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom. "This would enable self-management, potentially facilitate a quicker return to normal activities, and reduce the pressure to use antibiotics."

Show Full Article


Evidence exists that indicates probiotics and xylitol, a birch sugar that prevents bacterial growth, can help reduce recurrence of upper respiratory tract infections.

The study included 934 people in the UK during the four year study period (June 2010 to 2014), of whom 689 provided complete data for the trial. Using a symptom diary, participants reported the number of probiotic capsules and sticks of chewing gum used each day, as well as the severity of symptoms. They were study "compliant" if they had taken 75% of their allotted treatment.

Researchers found no significant effect of either probiotics or xylitol on sore throat (pharyngitis) symptoms.

"There were no significant differences between groups for both the xylitol and the probiotic groups, which suggests that neither intervention helped in controlling acute symptoms," the authors write.

The study is one of only a few that looks at the effectiveness of two potentially useful alternative therapies for acute sore throats.

"There is no reason for clinicians to advise patients to use either of these treatments for the symptomatic management of pharyngitis," they conclude.

The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Southampton, Southampton, UK, with a patient collaborator.

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions

Recommended Reading

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive