About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Prenatal Smoking Puts Kids at Risk of Psychotic Symptoms

by VR Sreeraman on October 3, 2009 at 3:39 PM
Font : A-A+

 Prenatal Smoking Puts Kids at Risk of Psychotic Symptoms

Pregnant women who smoke put their children at increased risk of developing psychotic symptoms in their teenage years, says a new study.

The research published in the October issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry has shown a link between maternal tobacco use and psychotic symptoms.

Advertisement

Researchers from Cardiff, Bristol, Nottingham and Warwick Universities studied 6,356 12-year-olds from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. All the children completed an interview for psychotic-like symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions. Just over 11 percent of the children (734) had suspected or definite symptoms of psychosis.

Smoking during pregnancy was found to be associated with an increased risk of psychotic symptoms in the children. The researchers observed a 'dose-response effect', meaning that the risk of psychotic symptoms was highest in the children whose mothers smoked the most heavily during pregnancy.
Advertisement

The study also examined whether alcohol use and cannabis use during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of psychotic symptoms.

Drinking during pregnancy was associated with increased psychotic symptoms, but only in the children of mothers who had drunk more than 21 units of alcohol a week in early pregnancy. Only a few mothers in the study said they had smoked cannabis during pregnancy, and this was not found to have any significant association with psychotic symptoms.

The reasons for the link between maternal tobacco use and psychotic symptoms are uncertain. But the researchers suggest that exposure to tobacco in the womb may have an indirect impact by affecting children's impulsivity, attention or cognition.

Dr Stanley Zammit, a psychiatrist at Cardiff University's School of Medicine and lead author of the study, said "In our cohort, approximately 19 per cent of adolescents who were interviewed had mothers who smoked during pregnancy.

"If our results are non-biased and reflect a causal relationship, we can estimate that about 20 per cent of adolescents in this cohort would not have developed psychotic symptoms if their mothers had not smoked. Therefore, maternal smoking may be an important risk factor in the development of psychotic experiences in the population."

Source: ANI
SRM
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Top 10 Vitamin B12 Foods for Vegetarians - Slideshow
Targeted Screening Program Beneficial for Prostate Cancer Screening
Are Menopause Symptoms Troubling You?: Try these Options
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Health Hazards of Smoking Smoking And Cancer Smoking And Tobacco Height and Weight-Kids Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Bubbles and Brews - Alcohol Facts Pregnancy and Antenatal Care Smoking Cigarette Smoking - A Silent Killer Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 

Most Popular on Medindia

Drug Interaction Checker Color Blindness Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Iron Intake Calculator Vent Forte (Theophylline) Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Hearing Loss Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use