Pregnancy Not Linked to Cognitive Function

by Colleen Fleiss on  March 22, 2019 at 7:03 AM Women Health News
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Childbearing decisions and timing are not associated with cognitive function, suggested new study. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
Pregnancy Not Linked to Cognitive Function
Pregnancy Not Linked to Cognitive Function

There are a number of reproductive and pregnancy characteristics that can have consequences for health outcomes later in life. Previous epidemiologic studies have reported that pregnancy history, including age at first pregnancy, is associated with midlife and later-life health risks, including diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and cardiovascular disease, which have been associated with later-life cognitive function. However, simply having children, even if it is later in life, doesn't appear to cause a cognitive decline.

Of 16 associations tested, four pregnancy exposures by four cognitive tests, only one was statistically significant. Women who reported ever being pregnant recalled 0.12 fewer words on the Buschke Selective Reminding Test for every year increase in age than women who had never been pregnant.

The finding was the basis of a study of more than 1,000 women, 77% of whom had at least one pregnancy, enrolled in the Rancho Bernardo Study through San Diego State University. The women attended a clinic visit between 1988 and 1992 where pregnancy history (ever pregnant, number of pregnancies, ages at first and last pregnancy) was recorded, and cognitive function was assessed with a total of four tests repeated up to seven times through 2016.

Study results appear in the article "Pregnancy history and cognitive aging among older women: the Rancho Bernardo Study."

"Examining the change in cognitive function over time, the difference between those who had been pregnant compared with those who didn't have children was one fewer word on recall per 10 years," says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director. "Neither the presence or absence of childbearing nor later age at pregnancy appears to significantly affect long-term cognition."

Source: Eurekalert

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