About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Potential Target to Treat Prostate Cancer Identified

by Sheela Philomena on March 5, 2011 at 2:23 PM
Font : A-A+

 Potential Target to Treat Prostate Cancer Identified

A potential target to treat an aggressive form of prostate cancer was identified by researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. SPINK1 gene, could be to prostate cancer.

Like HER2, SPINK1 occurs in only a small subset of prostate cancers about 10 percent. But the gene is an ideal target for a monoclonal antibody, the same type of drug as Herceptin, which is aimed at HER2 and has dramatically improved treatment for this aggressive type of breast cancer.

Advertisement

"Since SPINK1 can be made on the surface of cells, it attracted our attention as a therapeutic target. Here we show that a 'blocking' antibody to SPINK1 could slow the growth of prostate tumors in mice that were positive for the SPINK protein," says study author Arul Chinnaiyan, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator.

The study appears in the March 2 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

The researchers additionally found that SPINK1 can bind to a receptor called EGFR. They tested a drug that blocks EGFR, cetuximab, which is already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and found that this also reduced the cancerous effects of SPINK1.
Advertisement

Using mice, researchers first tested a monoclonal antibody a type of targeted treatment designed to go after a specific molecule (in this case, SPINK1). They then tested cetuximab. Tumors treated with the SPINK1 antibody shrunk 60 percent, while tumors treated with cetuximab shrunk 40 percent. By combining the two drugs, tumors were 74 percent smaller.

The effect was seen only in tumors that expressed SPINK1 and was not seen in tumors that did not express SPINK1.

Previous studies that looked at cetuximab for metastatic prostate cancer have been disappointing, with only 8 percent of patients showing some benefit. The researchers suggest that the poor results may be because the treatment is appropriate only for patients with SPINK1-positive tumors.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge on Sugar Intake and Oral Health
Test  Your Knowledge on Heart
Test Your Knowlege on Genes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Prostate Cancer Cancer and Homeopathy Trans-Urethral Resection of the Prostate Prostate Cancer Facts Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Prostate Cancer: Treatment Options Prostate Specific Antigen [PSA] Nutrition All Men Need 

Most Popular on Medindia

How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Drug Interaction Checker Find a Doctor Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Daily Calorie Requirements Color Blindness Calculator Blood - Sugar Chart Vent Forte (Theophylline) Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Sanatogen
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Potential Target to Treat Prostate Cancer Identified Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests