About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

People's Perceptions of What They Have Seen Changes With Fake Video Evidence

by Rajashri on September 17, 2009 at 9:27 PM
Font : A-A+

 People's Perceptions of What They Have Seen Changes With Fake Video Evidence

Researchers at the University of Warwick have revealed that false video evidence can dramatically change people's perceptions of events, and even convince them of testifying as an eyewitness to an event that never happened.

Associate Professor Dr. Kimberley Wade, from the Department of Psychology, led an experiment to see whether exposure to fabricated footage of an event could induce individuals to accuse another person of doing something they never did.

Advertisement

The researchers found that almost 50 percent of people, who were shown fake footage of an event they witnessed first hand, were ready to believe the video version rather than what they actually saw.

The team filmed 60 subjects as they took part in a computerised gambling task.

The subjects were unknowingly seated next to a member of the research team as they both separately answered a series of multiple-choice general knowledge questions.
Advertisement

One third of the subjects were told that the person sat next to them was suspected of cheating.

Another third were told the person had been caught on camera cheating, and the remaining group were actually shown the fake video footage.

Later, all subjects were asked to sign a statement only if they had seen the cheating take place.

Nearly 40 percent of the participants who had seen the doctored video complied.

Another 10 percent of the group signed when asked a second time by the researchers.

Only 10 percent of those who were told the incident had been caught on film but were not shown the video agreed to sign, and about 5 percent of the control group who were just told about the cheating signed the statement.

"Over the previous decade we have seen rapid advances in digital-manipulation technology. As a result, almost anyone can create convincing, yet fake, images or video footage. Our research shows that if fake footage is extremely compelling, it can induce people to testify about something they never witnessed," said Wade.

The study has been published in Applied Cognitive Psychology.

Source: ANI
RAS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
Dietary Factors Responsible for Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Production and Hair Loss
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Most Popular on Medindia

Iron Intake Calculator Noscaphene (Noscapine) Indian Medical Journals Blood Pressure Calculator Color Blindness Calculator Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Selfie Addiction Calculator Drug - Food Interactions Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

People's Perceptions of What They Have Seen Changes With Fake Video Evidence Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests