Over 6,000 Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacteria That Inhabit the Human Gut Discovered

by Colleen Fleiss on  December 1, 2018 at 10:27 PM Genetics & Stem Cells News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

A new approach helps identify thousands of antibiotic resistance genes found in bacteria that inhabit the human gut, said University of Birmingham scientists.
Over 6,000 Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacteria That Inhabit the Human Gut Discovered
Over 6,000 Antibiotic Resistance Genes in the Bacteria That Inhabit the Human Gut Discovered

The human gut is home to trillions of microorganisms, mainly bacteria. Most of these are sensitive to antibiotics, but a significant number of bacteria in the human gut have mechanisms that make them resistant to antibiotics. However, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in gut bacteria.

A team of researchers, led by the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA)in France, in collaboration with Professor Willem van Schaik at the University of Birmingham, developed a new method to identify resistance genes in gut bacteria by comparing thbe three-dimensional structures of known antibiotic resistance enzymes to the proteins that are produced by gut bacteria.

The researchers, in collaboration with other European teams, then applied this method to a catalogue of several million genes of the gut.

Professor Willem van Schaik, of the University of Birmingham's Institute of Microbiology and Infection, said: "Most gut bacteria live in a harmless relationship with the human host. However, the gut is also home to bacteria that can cause infections in hospitalised patients. "Unfortunately, these bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics and we need to understand the processes that contribute to this development.

"By comparing the structures of known antibiotic resistance proteins to proteins that are produced by the bacteria of the human gut, we found thousands of new antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut, highlighting the immense diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in this environment.

"Most of these genes appeared to be present in bacteria that live in a harmless relationship with the human host, so may not be an immediate threat to human health. "However, the continuing use of antibiotics may lead to these resistance genes being transferred to pathogenic bacteria, thereby further reducing the effectiveness of antibiotics in treating infections."

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

More News on:

Shigellosis MRSA - The Super Bug Drug Resistance - Antibiotic Resistance Probiotics - Support System for the Gut Food Safety for Health Weaver Syndrome Antibiotics Eye Infections Natural Antibiotics to Fight Bacterial Infections Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive