Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Slows Progression of Parkinson's Disease

by Medindia Content Team on November 27, 2007 at 3:09 PM
Omega-3 Fatty Acids Slows Progression of Parkinson's Disease

A new study has found that Omega-3 fatty acids protect the brain against Parkinson's, and also help prevent and slow down the progress of the disease.

The study, which was conducted by researchers of the Universite Laval under the supervision of Frederic Calon and Francesca Cicchetti, is the first to demonstrate the protective effect of a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids against Parkinson's.

Advertisement

Parkinson's disease is caused by the progressive death of the neurons responsible for producing dopamine, a neurotransmitter closely linked with movement control. The disease is usually diagnosed when 50 to 80percent of these neurons are already dead, and there is currently no medication to stop that process.

The researchers observed that when mice were fed an omega-3 rich diet, they seemed immune to the effect of MPTP, a toxic compound that causes the same damage to the brain as Parkinson's.
Advertisement

"This compound, which has been used for more than 20 years in Parkinson's research, works faster than the disease itself and is just as effective in targeting and destroying the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain," points out Calon.

In another test that was undertaken, a different group of mice that were fed an ordinary diet, developed the characteristic symptoms of the disease when injected with MPTP, including a 31 percent drop in dopamine-producing neurons and a 50 percent decrease in dopamine levels.

Analyses revealed that omega-3 fatty acidsóin particular DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), a specific type of omega-3óhad replaced the omega-6 fatty acids already present in the brains of the mice that had been given omega-3 supplementation.

"This demonstrates both the importance of diet on the brain's fatty acid composition and the brain's natural inclination for omega-3 fatty acids," observes Calon.

Since concentrations of other types of omega-3's had remained similar in both groups of mice, researchers suggest that the protective effect against Parkinson's comes essentially from DHA. Another conclusion to be drawn from this finding is that a brain containing a lot of omega-6 fatty acids may be a fertile ground for Parkinson's disease. These fatty acids, abundant in foods rich in either vegetable oil or animal fat, are already under suspicion for their role in the body's inflammatory response, cardiac disease, arthritis, and Alzheimer's.

In a balanced diet, the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids should be 4 to 1. However, the average Western diet contains 10 to 20 times more omega-6's than omega-3's.

"Our results suggest that this DHA deficiency is a risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease, and that we would benefit from evaluating omega-3's potential for preventing and treating this disease in humans," concluded the researcher.

The study will be published in the April 2008 edition of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal.

Source: ANI
LIN/P
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Senior Health News

Alarming Rates of Suicidal Ideation Among Elderly Transgenders
Elderly transgenders face a higher risk of suicide due to socio-economic factors with 25% of them giving serious thought to taking their own lives.
Is Improved Deep Sleep the Key to Dementia Prevention?
A decrease of 1% in deep sleep annually for individuals aged 60 and above results in a 27% higher dementia risk.
Cognitive Benefits for Older Adults Through Golf and Walking
In seniors, engaging in a single session of either 18 holes of golf, 6 km of Nordic walking, or 6 km of regular walking was observed to boost cognitive functions.
Could Higher Triglycerides Be the Key to Lower Dementia Risk?
Higher triglycerides linked to slower cognitive decline in various aspects, incl. global function, memory, & more over time.
Gene-Based Solutions for Elderly Lung Injury from COVID-19
In aged mice, decitabine, the anti-cancer drug demonstrated enhancements in vascular repair, inflammation resolution, and overall survival.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Slows Progression of Parkinson's Disease Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests