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Older Women from Appalachia Region in the US Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer

by Kathy Jones on September 28, 2013 at 10:14 PM
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 Older Women from Appalachia Region in the US Have Higher Rates of Late Stage Breast Cancer

A new study published in the journal Health Services Research reveals that older women from poorest areas of Appalachia in the US have higher incidence of later stage breast cancer as they fail to get regular breast cancer screening.

About 25 million people live in the 13 states that make up the Appalachian region, a 205,000-square-mile region that follows the spine of the Appalachian Mountains from southern New York to northern Mississippi. The National Cancer Institute has recently publicized Appalachia''s higher rates of cancer and poorer outcomes for residents diagnosed with cancer.

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To examine regional disparities in breast cancer screening and diagnosis, researchers evaluated Central Cancer Registry and Medicare claims data from three Appalachian states (Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania) to measure the incidence of later stage breast cancer in the region''s poorest counties compared with its more affluent counties. The counties'' economic statuses were compared based on factors such as unemployment rates, average home values and average monthly wages.

Women living in the most economically deprived counties-located in eastern Kentucky and southeastern Ohio-had 3.31 times as many late-stage tumors compared to those in the least deprived counties. Appalachian women in the study over age 65 had a 17.3 percent incidence of later stage breast cancer compared to a national average of 16 percent for women of the same age.
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The degree of disparity between the counties was stronger than the researchers had suspected, said lead author Roger T. Anderson, Ph.D., from the department of public health science at Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine.

"Overall, we found counties that are struggling economically tend to have inadequate health care resources or infrastructure and have the highest rates of later-stage breast cancer," said Anderson.

There were also disparities in how often women received recommended mammography screening. Although area women over the age of 65 had Medicare insurance coverage, only 53 percent had mammography screening within the 2 years before their cancer diagnosis compared with the national average of 67 percent.

Anderson explained that counties that struggle economically may set up a "perpetuating cycle of few services to promote cancer prevention and early detection in communities and less overall use of preventive services."

Clement Gwede, Ph.D., associate director of diversity at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, agreed, saying that solutions to the disparities in late stage breast cancer in the nation''s more distressed communities must include improved access to mammography screening resources, education and awareness, and related resources.

"Without these broad and sustained strategies, the vicious cycle will persist," Gwede added.

TERMS OF USE: This story is protected by copyright. When reproducing any material, including interview excerpts, attribution to the Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health, is required. While the information provided in this news story is from the latest peer-reviewed research, it is not intended to provide medical advice or treatment recommendations. For medical questions or concerns, please consult a health care provider.


Health Services Research is the official journal of the Academy Health and is published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. on behalf of the Health Research and Educational Trust. For information, contact Jennifer Shaw, HSR Business Manager at (312) 422 2646 or jshaw@aha.org. HSR is available online at /onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1475-6773/

Anderson RT, Yang TC, et al. Breast cancer screening, area deprivation, and later stage breast cancer in Appalachia: does geography matter. Health Services Research. 2013.



Source: Newswise
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