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Obese Children Face 50 Percent Higher Risk of Cancers in Adulthood

by Rukmani Krishna on July 28, 2012 at 6:24 AM
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 Obese Children Face 50 Percent Higher Risk of Cancers in Adulthood

Researchers have revealed a significant reason for children to maintain a healthy weight. The researchers are from Tel Aviv University.

Dr. Ari Shamiss and Dr. Adi Leiba of TAU's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and the Sheba Medical Center and his fellow researchers found that obesity in adolescence, defined as a Body Mass Index (BMI) in the 85th percentile and above, has a direct link to the incidence of urothelial (bladder and urinary tract) and colorectal cancers in adulthood.

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Children above the 84th percentile in BMI have a 1.42 percent greater chance, representing a 50 percent higher risk, of developing urothelial or colorectal cancers in adulthood compared to those beneath it, explained Dr. Shamiss.

To examine the relationship between obesity and cancers, the researchers conducted a longitudinal study of a cohort of 1.1 million males in the Israeli Defense Forces. Their health information was gathered by the army, with a follow-up period of 18 years.
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When they controlled for factors such as year of birth and education, the researchers discovered a clear link between childhood BMI and those who were diagnosed with urothelial or colorectal cancers later in life.

While the researchers have so far uncovered risk in two different types of cancer, Dr. Shamiss believes that further research will reveal connections between childhood obesity and a wide range of other cancers, including pancreatic cancer, which he is currently researching.

These findings show a distinct need for more research in this field, he noted.

"We need to examine the questions of whether obesity is a direct risk factor for cancer or a confounding factor for a genetic variation, for example," he stated, pointing out that basic research could help researchers to understand the connection between obesity and cancer on a deeper level.

One of the crucial questions, said Dr. Shamiss, is whether or not a successful weight loss attempt can reduce a child's risk of developing urothelial or colorectal cancer in adulthood.

Their current sample looks at children who were obese and those who were of normal weight, but does not reveal whether weight loss makes a significant difference.

New research should focus on researching the pathogenetic link between obesity and cancer, and whether losing weight in adulthood could lower the risk, Dr. Shamiss added.

The research has been published in the journals Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention and Obesity.

Source: ANI
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