About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Zealand Researchers Create Safe Vaccine Booster

by Gopalan on November 1, 2008 at 2:33 PM
Font : A-A+

 New Zealand Researchers Create Safe Vaccine Booster

New Zealand scientists believe they have created a powerful and safe adjuvant, needed to boost immune response. It is now being trialled as part of a new cancer vaccine.

Most vaccines need a 'magic' booster or adjuvant to boost our immune response to the vaccine. But the best adjuvants are too toxic for human use. Things could change for the better now.

Advertisement

The new synthetic adjuvant fabricated at the Industrial Research Limited (IRL) in Wellington could work across a wide range of vaccines against viruses, bacteria and cancer.

The commercial potential is large, as only one adjuvant is currently licensed for use in human vaccines in the USA according to Richard Furneaux, Group Leader of Carbohydrate Chemistry at IRL.
Advertisement

For years immunologists have used Freund's adjuvant to boost immune responses in animal studies of vaccines. It's usually an extract from the mycobacteria that cause TB.

But the associated toxic side-effects have prevented these adjuvants being used in humans. IRL's adjuvant is a glycolipid, a carbohydrate-based molecule derived from the cell wall of mycobacteria. It seems to have much of the same immune system-stimulating effect without the dangerous side-effects.

And because the new adjuvant has been made from scratch it can be precisely defined.

"Modern vaccines need to be composed of chemically defined components," explains Richard. "Our adjuvant appears to have similar properties to old-fashioned adjuvants, but it has been chemically synthesised."

Now IRL has entered in to an agreement with a leading New Zealand research centre, the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, to test out their adjuvant with a cancer vaccine.

The vaccine uses the patient's own cells, in this case immune system cells called dendritic cells, which have been trained to recognise tumour antigens. These trained cells turn the immune system against the tumour.

The cancer vaccine collaboration has two additional partners, Victoria University's commercialisation arm Victoria Link and the local development agency Grow Wellington.

The collaborators are testing the combination of Malaghan's vaccine with IRL's adjuvant in tumour models of melanoma to determine whether the vaccine works better in the presence of the adjuvant. The studies will form part of the pre-clinical evidence required to take the vaccine-adjuvant combination into clinical trials.

Source: Medindia
GPL/S
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Top 7 Benefits of Good Oral Hygiene
Healthy and Safer Thanksgiving 2021
Long-Term Glycemic Control - A Better Measure of COVID-19 Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Top 10 Vaccine Myths Debunked 

Recommended Reading
Scientists Develop Vaccine That may Provide Protection Against Multiple Strains of Bacteria
Researchers at University of California, Santa Barbara, have developed a new vaccine that may one .....
HIV Prime-Boost Vaccine Phase I Trial in India Soon
The ICMR, NACO and the IAVI, a New York based organization, are planning to conduct Phase I HIV ......
Top 10 Vaccine Myths Debunked
Childhood vaccination has saved many lives, yet lots more has to be done to increase awareness and e...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use