About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Test Helps Treat Severe Ovarian Cancer

by Ramya Rachamanti on June 18, 2020 at 1:33 PM
Font : A-A+

New Test Helps Treat Severe Ovarian Cancer

New test could guide and improve treatment options for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The development and validation of the test are outlined in a new study, published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The study--led by researchers at UBC's faculty of medicine, University of New South Wales, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Mayo Clinic--is one of the largest ovarian cancer investigations to date, involving data compiled by more than 50 research institutes and involving more than 3,800 ovarian cancer patients worldwide.

Advertisement


"With this new test, we'll be able to give researchers, clinicians and patients more insight into the disease, which could pave the way for more targeted treatment down the road," says the study's senior author, Dr. Michael Anglesio, a molecular biologist, assistant professor in UBC's department of obstetrics and gynaecology, investigator at the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) and scientist at OVCARE, B.C.'s multidisciplinary gynecological cancer research team.

The new test, known as PrOTYPE (Predictor of high-grade serous Ovarian carcinoma molecular subTYPE), is specifically designed to analyze and classify high-grade serous ovarian cancer, the most common and lethal form of ovarian cancer. Principal investigators validated the test in laboratories at BC Cancer and Vancouver General Hospital.
Advertisement

Using PrOTYPE, researchers and clinicians alike will be able to further classify an individual patient's tumour into one of four known molecular subtypes, each with its distinct biological features believed to respond differently to treatment options.

"Right now, high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients are all treated the same, but by knowing what subtype their tumour falls into, we can begin to explore how certain treatments may prove more beneficial for individual patients," says the study's lead author Dr. Aline Talhouk, a translational data scientist, assistant professor in UBC's department of obstetrics and gynaecology, VCHRI investigator and OVCARE scientist.

Prior to the development of PrOTYPE, subtyping tests using gene expression analysis for high-grade serous ovarian cancer relied on the aggregation of large patient cohorts and the examination of all of the genes in the genome at once -- a situation that made them impractical for use in clinical settings, says Anglesio.

"Doctors will never see a few hundred patients walk through their clinic door at one time. It's just not the reality," says Anglesio.

With PrOTYPE, which was designed for clinical use, a small amount of information--55 informative genes from a small tissue sample--can quickly determine the tumour subtype with more than 95 per cent accuracy. The researchers also developed a corresponding web tool, enabling clinicians to print out a report that can be added to a patient's records.

"We've developed a push-button solution. All that's needed is the tumour from the patient in question and a common reference to compare the data to. Before this test, no one could do that," says Anglesio. "We now have a robust way of figuring out which of the four subtypes a patient fits into."

The researchers see great potential for the test to one day guide patient care. The test is already being used in ongoing clinical trials investigating whether certain subtypes are more sensitive to particular treatments among women with recurrent high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

"This test has opened up new opportunities and treatment avenues to explore. It will be important to re-evaluate treatment options and test new targets for therapeutics in light of this new ability," says Talhouk.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Black Tea Protects against Blood Pressure and Heart Diseases
Green Mediterranean Diet may Help Repair Age-Related Brain Damages
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month 2022
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Ovarian Cancer Cancer and Homeopathy Undescended Testicles Cancer Facts Cancer Tattoos A Body Art Varicocele Meigs Syndrome Testicle Pain - Symptom Evaluation Ovarian Pain 

Recommended Reading
Ovarian Cancer
Ovarian cancer affects both the ovaries and is referred to as the ''silent killer'' as the symptoms ...
Meigs Syndrome
Meigs'' syndrome is a medical condition with a triad of symptoms including benign ovarian tumor, asc...
Ovarian Pain
Ovarian pain is caused due to various conditions like ovarian cysts, ovarian tumors, endometriosis, ...
Tattoos A Body Art
Tattoos are a rage among college students who sport it for the ‘cool dude’ or ‘cool babe’ look...
Testicle Pain - Symptom Evaluation
A sudden, severe pain in the testis may be due to testicular torsion. Testicles inside the scrotum a...
Undescended Testicles
An undescended testicle / testis is one that has not descended into the scrotal sac before birth. It...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
CONSULT A DOCTOR
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)