About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New HIV Vaccine may Boost Patientsí Immune System, Improves Effects of Medications

by Shirley Johanna on April 29, 2015 at 3:27 PM
Font : A-A+

New HIV Vaccine may Boost Patientsí Immune System, Improves Effects of Medications

A HIV vaccine containing protein necessary for virus replication can boost immune system of a HIV- infected patient and increase the effect of antiretroviral drugs.

"We prove for the first time that antiretroviral therapy may be intensified by a vaccine," said lead researcher Barbara Ensoli from the Italian National AIDS Center at the Istituto Superiore di Sanita in Rome, Italy.

Advertisement

"These results open new scenarios to investigate, namely whether this vaccine may help with virus control where patients have low adherence to antiretroviral therapy, simplify treatment, and reduce transmission of the disease," Ensol noted.

When people are first diagnosed with HIV they are put on antiretroviral drugs, also known as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). These drugs can stop the virus reproducing almost completely.
Advertisement

When taking HAART, however, it is known that the virus can still replicate at low levels and accumulate in a latent form in what are called "reservoirs".

The new study has now found that a vaccine that targets the viral protein "Tat", which is produced early on in HIV infection, can increase effectiveness of these drugs used in current HIV treatment.

For the study, the researchers conducted a Phase II clinical trial that injected 168 HIV-infected patients with the vaccine that contained either 7.5 micrograms or 30 micrograms of the Tat protein.

For both doses, the participants received the vaccine once a month over the course of either three or five months. The patients also continued on HAART treatment.

Patients were followed for three years (144 weeks). It was found that the vaccine induced production of anti-Tat antibodies.

A significant growth of CD4+ T cells was also seen, which is a sign of the immune system's strength.

There was also an increase in the T, B and other immune cells. The biggest response was seen among those who received the vaccine with 30 micrograms of Tat over the course of three months. These effects were found to persist for all the three years.

The study was published in the open-access journal Retrovirology.

Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

Latest AIDS/HIV News

Who Is Responsible for the Blunting of AIDS Epidemic?
In India, annual HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths continue to drop. Between 2010 and 2021, new HIV infections dropped by 46%.
Are Countries Missing on HIV Self-Testing?
Globally, all countries have promised to end AIDS by 2030, for which it is essential to safeguard individuals living with HIV to complete HIV care services.
 Monthly Vaginal Ring Prevents HIV During Breastfeeding Safely
How can you prevent HIV while breastfeeding? A monthly vaginal ring containing the antiretroviral drug dapivirine safely prevents HIV infection while breastfeeding.
De-stigmatizing Move Against HIV
Union Minister of State for Health Bharti Pravin Pawar had said that the government is providing free lifelong antiretroviral (ARV) medicines for people living with HIV.
Are we on the Right Track to End AIDS by 2030
Dr. Korosi said the goal to end AIDS by 2030 is badly off track, as inequalities, discrimination, and disregard for human rights are hampering our progress.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

New HIV Vaccine may Boost Patientsí Immune System, Improves Effects of Medications Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests