Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Medindia
Advertisement

New Early Warning System for the Brain Development of Babies Published in Video Journal: Research

by Rukmani Krishna on March 18, 2013 at 11:59 PM
 New Early Warning System for the Brain Development of Babies Published in Video Journal: Research

A new research technique, pioneered by Dr. Maria Angela Franceschini, will be published in JoVE. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School have developed a non-invasive optical measurement system to monitor neonatal brain activity via cerebral metabolism and blood flow.

Of the nearly four million children born in the United States each year, 12% are born preterm, 8% are born with low birth weight, and 1-2% of infants are at risk for death associated with respiratory distress. The result is an average infant mortality rate of 6 deaths per 1,000 live births. These statistics, though low compared to those of 50 or even 20 years ago, are troubling both to parents and to clinicians. Until recently there were no effective bedside methods to screen for brain injury or monitor injury progression that can contribute to developmental abnormalities or infant mortality. Dr. Franceschini's new system does both.

Advertisement

"We want to measure cerebral vascular development and brain health in babies," Dr. Franceschini tells us. Because neuronal metabolism is hard to measure directly, scientists instead evaluate cerebral oxygen metabolism, which highly corresponds to neuronal metabolism. Dr. Franceschini and her team have developed a near infrared optical system to quantify cerebral oxygen metabolism by measuring blood oxygen saturation and blood flow.

The technology is an improvement on continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS), which measures oxygen saturation but does not provide long-term or real time brain monitoring. Instead, frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) is used in conjunction with diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to get a more robust evaluation of infant health. Dr. Franceschini explains, "CWNIRS has been used for many years but it only provides relative measurements of blood oxygen saturation. Our technology allows quantification of multiple vascular parameters and evaluation of oxygen metabolism which gives a more direct picture of infant distress."

Source: Eurekalert
Font : A-A+

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Readings

Latest Child Health News

Vitamin D Supplements Fail to Prevent Child Bone Fractures
In individuals with vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplements raised their levels to the normal range. Despite this, they did not influence fracture risk.
Innate Harmonies: Newborns Sense Musical Beats
Gaining deeper understanding of early perception is crucial for unraveling infant cognition and understanding how musical abilities impact early development.
Vitamin B-12 in Breast Milk Promotes Baby's Brain Health
Prenatal and postnatal B-12 vitamins increase the micro-nutrients in breast milk to support the development of the baby's brain.
Group B Streptococcus Threat to Newborns
The presence of Streptococcus in the placenta was associated with a two- to three-fold increase in the probability of neonatal unit admission.
Can Maternal Discrimination Influence Baby's Brain Development?
Facing discrimination and acculturating during pregnancy could not only affect the mother but also potentially harm the baby's brain health.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

New Early Warning System for the Brain Development of Babies Published in Video Journal: Research Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests