About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Compounds Detected in Wagyu Beef Explains Its Allure

by Hannah Joy on October 13, 2017 at 11:36 AM
Font : A-A+

New Compounds Detected in Wagyu Beef Explains Its Allure

Wagyu beef has a very distinct aroma and several key odorants have been detected, which contribute to the delicacy's alluring aroma, reveals a new study.

Renowned for its soft texture and characteristic flavor, Wagyu beef often referred to as Kobe beef in the U.S. has become one of the world's most sought-after meats. The study appeared in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Advertisement


Considered by some to be the champagne or caviar of beef, Waygu is one of the rarest and most expensive meats in the world. It comes from Japanese Black cattle which accounts for 95 percent of Wagyu and three other species raised in Japan.

The meat's distinctive marbling, juiciness and succulent taste are enhanced by its sweet aroma, known as "wagyuko," that has been compared to coconut or fruit. In recent years, scientists have been trying to nail down what makes Wagyu aroma distinctive from other types of beef.
Advertisement

In one study, researchers found that one particular compound appeared to have an important influence on the meat's aroma. But the samples used in that experiment were not cooked at the optimal temperature.

To get a better sense of which odorants are responsible for Wagyu's aroma, Satsuki Inagaki and colleagues decided to try a different approach.

The researchers conducted an aroma extraction dilution analysis of Matsusaka-beef (a kind of Wagyu ribeye) and grass-fed Australia beef (loin).

The team heated the samples to about 175 degrees Fahrenheit to simulate optimal cooking conditions. Using gas chromatography techniques, the research team detected 10 newly identified compounds in the Wagyu beef aroma, including one previously associated with cooked chicken that had an egg-white odor.

Several Wagyu compounds were also found in the Australian beef aroma. However, the researchers say they likely don't smell alike because of the differing amounts of these constituents in the meats.

The most potent odorant of Wagyu beef was a compound known to be derived from fatty acids present in the meat.

The researchers say that this study not only clarifies which compounds are the main odorants in cooked Wagyu, it also helps confirm that particular types and amounts of unsaturated fatty acids in the beef play a key part in this aromatic process.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.


Recommended Reading
Up to 5% Horsemeat Shown in Beef Products Tested By EU DNA Tests
The European Commission said that thousands of DNA tests on beef products across the European Union ...
50,000 Tonnes of Beef Recalled By Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority
The Dutch Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority (NVWA)recalled around 50,000 tonnes of beef ......
Physically Fit Kids Have Beefier Brain White Matter Than Their Less-Fit Friends: Study
A study of 9 and 10-year-olds finds that kids who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and ......
Supreme Court Adjourns the Matter of Beef Ban for 8 Weeks
The Supreme Court on Monday adjourned the hearing on ban on beef in Maharashtra and its export for ....

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use