About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

New Animal Model to Understand Metastasis in Bone Cancer

by Julia Samuel on August 30, 2016 at 5:06 PM
Font : A-A+

New Animal Model to Understand Metastasis in Bone Cancer

A modified version of an orthotopic model that allows researchers to recreate more closely the metastatic steps in Ewing sarcoma (ES), has been developed by the Sarcoma research group of Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Martnez-Tirado.

This new model has been used for the first time as part of the team's latest work, published in Oncotarget, which provides new insights into metastatic processes in ES, and may become a valuable experimental tool to analyze metastatic potential in different kinds of sarcomas.

Advertisement


"We believe that this orthotopic model recapitulates more closely the metastatic steps in ES as the primary tumor grows in its natural environment" explains Dr Martnez-Tirado. Orthotopic models are based on the implantation of tumor cells directly into the organ of origin, which allows interaction between these cells and the surrounding host tissues.

In this case, ES cells were injected into the calf muscles of the mouse, and once the tumor reached a certain volume, the muscles were surgically resected. "This procedure involves a low-aggressive surgery that allows the survival of the mice with a normal mouse life for a period long enough for the development of distant metastases", says the researcher.
Advertisement

Orthotopic models are considered more clinically relevant and better predictive models, as it has been shown that the interaction of tumor cells with its natural environment affects their growth, differentiation, and drug sensitivity. Moreover, injected tumor cells can spread to metastatic sites in other organs, with specificities comparable to the human situation.

"Thanks to this approach, we were able to identify how the CAV1 protein regulates a pro-metastatic pathway in ES and the role of the RPS6 and RSK1 proteins as key nodes of this process. ES patients could potentially benefit from these findings."

"The treatment and prognosis of patients are determined among other factors by the presence of these metastases. Therefore, a full comprehensive understanding of ES metastatic process is mandatory to develop novel therapeutic strategies. That is why this in vivo orthotopic animal model may be an extremely useful asset to study metastases not only in ES but in other sarcomas too" Martnez-Tirado concludes.



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Alarming Cesarean Section Trends in India - Convenience or Compulsion of Corporate Healthcare
Quiz on Low-Calorie Diet for Diabetes
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis Renal Osteodystrophy / Mineral Bone Disorder 

Most Popular on Medindia

Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Blood Donation - Recipients Find a Doctor The Essence of Yoga Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Sanatogen Drug Interaction Checker Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Indian Medical Journals
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

New Animal Model to Understand Metastasis in Bone Cancer Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests