About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Nerve Cell Production Linked With Memory in Humans

by Kathy Jones on August 28, 2010 at 10:59 PM
Font : A-A+

 Nerve Cell Production Linked With Memory in Humans

The production of new nerve cells in the human brain is linked to learning and memory, scientists have found.

The University of Florida researchers provided clues about processes involved in age- and health-related memory loss and reveal potential cellular targets for drug therapy.

Advertisement

The researchers studied how stem cells in a memory-related region of the brain, called the hippocampus, proliferate and change into different types of nerve cells.

"The findings suggest that if we can increase the regeneration of nerve ells in the hippocampus we can alleviate or prevent memory loss in humans," said Florian Siebzehnrubl of the UF College of Medicine.
Advertisement

"This process gives us what pharmacologists call a 'druggable target.'"

In animal studies, it was found that disrupting nerve cell generation resulted in the loss of memory function, while increasing the production of new nerve cells led to improved memory.

To investigate whether the same is true in humans, the UF researchers, in collaboration with colleagues in Germany, studied 23 patients who had epilepsy and varying degrees of associated memory loss.

They analyzed stem cells from brain tissue removed during epilepsy surgery, and evaluated the patients' pre-surgery memory function.

In patients with low memory test scores, stem cells could not generate new nerve cells in laboratory cultures, but in patients with normal memory scores, stem cells were able to proliferate.

That showed, for the first time, a clear correlation between patient's memory and the ability of their stem cells to generate new nerve cells.

"The study gives us insights on how to approach the problem of cognitive aging and age-related memory loss, with the hope of developing therapies that can improve cognitive health in the aging," said J. Lee Dockery of the McKnight Brain Research Foundation.

"Probably everyone will experience some degree of age-related memory loss as a result of the normal aging process," said Dennis A. Steindler of UF's McKnight Brain Institute.

"There is no reason to believe that this is irreversible, and we must find new approaches and therapeutics for allowing everyone to experience productivity and lifelong memory and learning. Facilitating the generation of new functional neurons in our brains throughout life may be one such approach for helping this cause," he added.

The findings were published in the journal Brain.

Source: ANI
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test  Your Knowledge on Heart
Test Your Knowlege on Genes
Obesity in Teens Make Inroads into Early Atrial Fibrillation
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Exercises to Improve Memory Brachial Plexus Injury Foods to Improve Memory Power Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) Quick and Easy Ways to Memorize Things 7 Ways How Writing by Hand Improves Brain Power 

Most Popular on Medindia

Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Find a Hospital Drug - Food Interactions Vent Forte (Theophylline) How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Hearing Loss Calculator Iron Intake Calculator Selfie Addiction Calculator Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Blood - Sugar Chart
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Nerve Cell Production Linked With Memory in Humans Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests