About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Medical Students Learn Better By Simulating Situations

by Tanya Thomas on July 16, 2009 at 10:41 AM
Font : A-A+

 Medical Students Learn Better By Simulating Situations

As per a recent study done by researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, simulating medical scenarios helps medical students learn and retain vital information.

The study, recently published in Medical Teacher, shows that medical students not only enjoy patient-simulation experiences but also learn more from them, said Michael T. Fitch, M.D., Ph.D., the senior author of the paper and an associate professor of emergency medicine at the School of Medicine.

Advertisement

"There's no question that people like it," Fitch said. "People really enjoy participating in an immersive learning environment. The purpose of this study was to find out whether this also makes our students learn and retain knowledge better."

For the study, first-year medical students received a traditional lecture on basic neuroscience concepts from a faculty member, followed by a brief questionnaire in an informal class exercise two days later.
Advertisement

Three days after that, without further discussion of the questionnaire or receiving answers, those same students participated in a 90-minute live simulation of a medical emergency. Students were told that the patient - "SimMan," a computerized mannequin that can be programmed to have different medical problems - had altered mental status, nausea and vomiting.

A team of physicians played the roles of EMS workers, nurses and family members, and the students worked through the decision making process to arrive at a diagnosis. The physician running the simulation stopped action periodically to lead the group in discussion of the basic neuroscience concepts being learned during the scenario.

Typically, such simulations are used in small groups and in clinical settings, but the School of Medicine started experimenting with the use of simulation in student neuroscience lecture settings in 2006.

Immediately after the simulation, the students were presented with the same four questions they were asked following the lecture. Their answers showed that they were much more likely to demonstrate mastery of the information by answering all four questions correctly on the post-simulation test than on the post-lecture only test, Fitch said.

For two of the four questions, significantly more students chose the correct answer on the post-simulation test than on the post-lecture test, while little or no change was seen on the other two questions.

"We're interested in developing new and innovative ways to teach medical information," Fitch said, adding that the results of the study could spur medical schools to consider more large-group simulation exercises in addition to traditional lectures.

"Seeing how things apply to clinical practice is very important in medical training. Students may remember a specific patient encounter and anchor that memory to the information provided, which can improve learning and lead to long-term retention of information."



Source: Eurekalert
TAN
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Test Your Knowledge on Lung Transplantation
Baldness can be Cured and Prevented: let us see How!
Drinking Beer or Wine Every Day Could Cause Age-related Diseases
View all
News Archive
Date
Category
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Most Popular on Medindia

Noscaphene (Noscapine) Sanatogen Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Sinopril (2mg) (Lacidipine) Drug Side Effects Calculator Drug - Food Interactions Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam) Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) The Essence of Yoga Color Blindness Calculator
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE