About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Male Reproductive Health, Environmental Factors Play a Role in Declining Birth Rate

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on December 14, 2015 at 1:45 PM
Font : A-A+

Male Reproductive Health, Environmental Factors Play a Role in Declining Birth Rate

The birth rate is declining in all industrialized countries. A new study suggests that socio-economic factors and women's age are not solely to blamed for this drop, male reproductive health and environmental factors are also significant.

A University of Copenhagen statement said, "Researchers from Denmark, the US and Finland studied a number of factors related to fertility, and one of the main conclusions of their study was that poor semen quality contributed to increases in infertility and the use of assisted reproductive technology."

Advertisement


The researchers observed lower levels of testosterone in average men.

First author of the article, professor Niels E. Skakkebaek from the department of growth and reproduction at Rigshospitalet and the University of Copenhagen, said, "I was surprised that we found such poor semen quality among young men aged 20 to 25 years. The average man had up to 90% of abnormal sperm. Normally, there would be so many sperms that a few abnormal ones would not affect fertility. However, it appears that we are at a tipping point in industrialized countries where poor semen quality is so widespread that we must suspect that it results in low pregnancy rates."
Advertisement

The research team said, "Many of the male reproductive problems could be due to damage to the testes during embryonic development. While the reproductive problems could arise from genetic changes, recent evidence suggests that most often they are related to environmental exposures of the fetal testes."

Skakkebaek said, "Since the disorders in male genitals have increased over a relatively short period of time, genetics alone cannot explain this development. There is no doubt that environmental factors are playing a role and that endocrine-disrupting chemicals, which have the same effect on animals, are under great suspicion. The exposure that young people are subjected to today can determine not only their own, but also their children's, ability to procreate."

Skakkebaek suggested that the study has significant public health implications as there is much focus on the age of delivering women as the only biological factor behind the low birth rates in industrialized countries. He said, "Age does indeed play a role. However, we found in our analysis that the average age of a delivering woman in Denmark in 1901 was the same as today, suggesting that delayed childbearing alone cannot explain the current trends."

More research in reproductive medicine needs to be done to understand and address the declining fertility rates, according to researchers.

The article was recently published in Physiological Reviews.

Source: IANS
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) 

Most Popular on Medindia

Color Blindness Calculator Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects How to Reduce School Bag Weight - Simple Tips Post-Nasal Drip Sanatogen Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Indian Medical Journals Hearing Loss Calculator Drug Interaction Checker Find a Hospital
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Male Reproductive Health, Environmental Factors Play a Role in Declining Birth Rate Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests