About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Malaria Transmission Now Stopped by Bacterial Infection

by Dr. Enozia Vakil on May 10, 2013 at 6:39 PM
Font : A-A+

 Malaria Transmission Now Stopped by Bacterial Infection

To break the chain of malaria transmission, US scientists have come up with a way to infect mosquitoes with bacteria.

A similar approach has helped cut back on dengue in some locations, and researchers hope that the findings could offer a path toward reducing malaria among the most common mosquitoes in the Middle East and South Asia.

Advertisement

The bacterial infection is inheritable and could be passed on for as many as 34 generations of mosquitoes, rendering them immune to malaria parasites, reported experts from the National Institutes of Health in the journal Science.

Scientists injected Anopheles mosquito embryos with Wolbachia, a common insect bacterium. When the mosquitoes matured, they bred the adult females with uninfected males.
Advertisement

The infection endured for 34 generations of mosquitoes. The study ended at that point, so it remains unknown how much longer the bacterial infection would have been passed on, preventing malaria transmission.

Researchers also tried introducing the bacterial infection in small numbers of adult mosquitoes, between five and 20 percent of females in a given population.

Within eight generations, all of the mosquitoes were infected with the malaria-blocking infection.

The evidence supports the "potential of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes as a malaria control strategy," said the study.

Previous research has shown the bacterium could prevent malaria-inducing Plasmodium parasites from developing in Anopheles mosquitoes.

But in this study, scientists were able to show for the first time that they could create mosquitoes with a stable Wolbachia infection that passed consistently from mother to offspring.

Researchers also discovered that the infection killed malaria parasites both in the mosquitoes' guts and in the salivary glands, the main avenue for transmission to humans via mosquito bites.

About 660,000 people die worldwide every year from malaria.

Source: AFP
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Fermented Skin Care
Television Binge-Watching May Boost the Risk of Deadly Blood Clots
Western Diet may Augment the Risk of Autoimmune Diseases
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Malaria-water Malaria Mosquito Diseases Flu Fever Whipple’s Disease Malaria - Protection Strategies 
Recommended Reading
Fever
Fever or Pyrexia is an elevation in normal body temperature. Causes of fever include infections, inj...
Malaria
Malaria is caused by a parasite that enters blood through the bite of an infected mosquito. It is ch...
Malaria - Protection Strategies
Malaria is a dangerous disease with lethal consequences that requires protective measures for preven...
Mosquito Diseases
Mosquito-borne diseases, like malaria, filaria, dengue, etc are common in places conducive of mosqu...
Whipple’s Disease
Whipple’s disease is a bacterial infection that affects multiple systems like the digestive tract, b...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
open close
ASK A DOCTOR ONLINE
I have read and I do accept terms of use - Telemedicine

Advantage Medindia: FREE subscription for 'Personalised Health & Wellness website with consultation' (Value Rs.300/-)