About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Lingering Negative Responses to Stress Linked With Health Problems

by Colleen Fleiss on April 11, 2018 at 2:00 AM
Font : A-A+

Lingering Negative Responses to Stress Linked With Health Problems

Individuals whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with those who are able to "let it go," found research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

"Our research shows that negative emotions that linger after even minor, daily stressors have important implications for our long-term physical health," says psychological scientist Kate Leger of the University of California, Irvine. "When most people think of the types of stressors that impact health, they think of the big things, major life events that severely impact their lives, such as the death of a loved one or getting divorced," Leger says. "But accumulating findings suggest that it's not just the big events, but minor, everyday stressors that can impact our health as well."

Advertisement


Evidence from previous studies suggests a clear association between same-day responses to stress and long-term well-being, but the impact of lingering emotional responses remained unclear. That is, does it make a difference if a stressor - such as a flat tire, a bad grade, or an argument -- leads to negative emotions that spill over into the following day? To find out, Leger and colleagues Susan T. Charles and David M. Almeida analyzed data from the Midlife in the United States Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of adults.

As part of the study, participants completed an 8-day survey of negative emotion; each day, they reported how much of the time over the previous 24 hours they had felt a variety of emotions (e.g., lonely, afraid, irritable, and angry). They also reported the stressors that they experienced each day. In a subsequent part of the study that took place 10 years later, the participants completed surveys that assessed their chronic illnesses and functional limitations. Participants reported the degree to which they were able to carry out basic and everyday tasks, such as dressing themselves, climbing a flight of stairs, carrying groceries, and walking several blocks. As expected, people tended to report higher negative emotion if they had experienced a stressor the previous day compared with if they hadn't experienced any stressor the day before.
Advertisement

These associations emerged independently of participants' gender, education, and baseline health and they held even after the researchers took participants' same-day emotional responses and average number of stressors into account. "This means that health outcomes don't just reflect how people react to daily stressors, or the number of stressors they are exposed to - there is something unique about how negative they feel the next day that has important consequences for physical health," explains Leger.

Leger and colleagues hypothesize that this link could play out through activation of stress-related systems or through health behaviors, two potential mechanisms that offer avenues for future research. "Stress is common in our everyday lives. It happens at work, it happens at school, it happens at home and in our relationships," says Leger. "Our research shows that the strategy to 'just let it go' could be beneficial to our long term physical health."

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Woman with Rare Spinal Cord Defect from Birth Sues Doctor
Toothache
World AIDS Day 2021 - End Inequalities, End AIDS
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Palpitations And Arrhythmias Stress Relief Through Alternative Medicine Stress and the Gender Divide Andropause / Male Menopause Heart Attack- Lifestyle Risks Is Your Man Moody? Tired All The Time Women More Prone to Road Rage Quiz on Weight Loss Stress 

Recommended Reading
Positive Effect of Negative Emotions: Chocolate Tastes Better When You Are Dieting
Kelly Goldsmith and her colleagues found that guilt activates cognitions related to pleasures which ...
Techniques for Stress Relief
Stress is a part of everyday lives. It can be beneficial to an extent, but when it disrupts the ......
How Emotional Language Influences Persuasion?
People are tend to use more emotional language to persuade, even when it could backfire, revealed .....
Andropause / Male Menopause
Andropause or male menopause causing low libido in a man is due to decreasing level of male hormones...
Heart Attack- Lifestyle risks
Heart attack is the death of the heart muscle due to loss of blood supply. Simple guidelines to avoi...
Is Your Man Moody?
Women get confused by the behavior of men in their lives. It is time they realize that men too have ...
Palpitations And Arrhythmias
Palpitations are unpleasant sensation of one’s own heartbeat....
Stress and the Gender Divide
Stress has become entwined in the current lifestyle of a young working couple and has resulted in th...
Tired All The Time
Tired All The Time (TATT) syndrome is not only about feeling of tired, however there are a host of o...
Women More Prone to Road Rage
If you find your self getting mad and cursing under your breath while driving, you are a victim of r...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use