About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Knocking Out Single Cardiac Gene Increases Longevity

by VR Sreeraman on July 29, 2007 at 1:37 PM
Font : A-A+

Knocking Out Single Cardiac Gene Increases Longevity

Researchers have found that knocking out a single cardiac gene in mice increased its lifespan.

The mutant mouse lacks a single protein, type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5), that makes it less prone to the effects of hormone adrenaline, and more resistant to some forms of stress.

Advertisement

The study was conducted by a team of researchers including Stephen Vatner and Junichi Sadoshima colleagues at the New Jersey Medical School at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in Newark.

Earlier researches have shown that mutant mice lacking AC5 were more resistant to heart failure caused by pressure within the heart. Adrenaline signalling blocking drugs, beta-blockers, are known to help patients who have suffered heart attacks or suffer from an irregular heartbeat.
Advertisement

As part of this study, researchers actually were examining whether removing AC5 leads to a healthier heart but discovered in the process that mutant mice lived longer than their normal counterparts.

The study noted that AC5 could boost the lifespan by reducing the stress caused when chemically reactive forms of oxygen accumulate. The increasing damage from these molecules is thought to play part in ageing.

Researchers also conducted experiments on yeast, by increasing the level of a protein called ERK2, which regulates oxidative-stress responses and was produced by AC5 mutant mice more.

The study found that the yeast with increased ERK2 levels lived longer.

The researchers also suggested metabolic changes in mutant mice for although young mutants weigh the same as normal mice, elderly mutants weighed less even when they ate more.

Researchers also noted that the mutant mice might have some anti-cancer properties.

"The majority of normal mice die from some sort of tumour. It is possible that the mutants are longer lived because they are able to stave off tumour formation," Nature quoted Vatner, as saying.

Source: ANI
SRM/C
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Spirituality and Mental Health
Health Benefits of Sea Buckthorn
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
DNA Finger Printing Palpitations And Arrhythmias Tips to Live Longer Statins Cardiomyopathy 

Recommended Reading
Super Fruit Fly may Harbor Hope for Human Longevity
Researchers at USC and Caltech have spectacularly slowed aging in fruit flies with a new technique ....
Sensible Diet, Exercise and Weight Control Increases Longevity
A new research has shown just how a sensible diet, exercise and weight control helps people live a ....
Cardiomyopathy
Cardiomyopathy weakens the heart muscles and the heart loses strength to pump blood throughout the b...
DNA Finger Printing
DNA fingerprinting is a technique which helps forensic scientists and legal experts solve crimes, id...
Palpitations And Arrhythmias
Palpitations are unpleasant sensation of one’s own heartbeat....
Statins
Statins are new wonder drugs that are proving to be efficacious, not merely in relieving symptoms bu...
Tips to Live Longer
Though life is temporary and short, it is possible to maximize the span of our existence by living h...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use