About Careers Internship MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Keep your Dogs Away from Easter Chocolates

by Shirley Johanna on March 21, 2016 at 5:04 PM
Font : A-A+

Veterinarians have warned pet owners to keep chocolates away from their pets as it is the main cause of poisoning in dogs.

Easter is known for chocolate eggs and treats to celebrate the end of Lent. Families share chocolate eggs with their pets as part of their celebration, but, this could lead to chocolate poisoning in pets. The cases of chocolate poisonings are highly reported during Easter after Christmas.

Advertisement

Keep your Dogs Away from Easter Chocolates
Keep your Dogs Away from Easter Chocolates

Director of clinical services at Vets4Pets, Dr Huw Stacey, said, "We want to make sure that the 8.5 million dogs in the UK are safe from chocolate this Easter. Whether it's caused by owners giving their pet an Easter egg as a present or chocolate is accidentally left within their reach, we see an influx of pets suffering from chocolate poisoning at this time of year."

"Chocolate is particularly toxic to dogs, as it contains caffeine and theobromine, two substances that dogs are incredibly sensitive to."

Roasted cocoa beans contain theobromine and caffeine. When these substances are ingested by dogs, it affects the heart, central nervous system and kidneys.
Advertisement

"Unlike humans, dogs find it difficult to break down and excrete these substances. This means they can easily build-up in the dog's system and lead to poisoning," added Dr Stacey.

"The higher the level of cocoa in the chocolate, the more theobromine it contains and the more hazardous the chocolate becomes to pets. Therefore dark chocolate is the biggest danger to dogs and is more likely to cause medical complications than white or regular milk chocolate. The level of toxicity also depends on the size of the dog, but for most dogs even small amounts of chocolate can trigger unpleasant reactions."

The symptoms of chocolate poisoning in pets can include vomiting, diarrhea, increased body temperature and heart rate, and rapid breathing. Chocolate poisoning can even lead to seizures and cardiac failure.

Dr Stacey added, "For owners and their pets to enjoy a happy Easter together, the best option is to keep all chocolate out of their reach and give them an animal-friendly treat instead, like a dental chew or even special dog-friendly 'chocolate' treats."

Chocolate poisoning cases are not reported in cats, rabbits and rodents. However, they can still suffer from health issues after digesting chocolate.

Source: Medindia
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
World Heart Day in 2022- Use Heart for Every Heart
Anemia among Indian Women and Children Remains a Cause of Concern- National Family Health Survey-5
H1N1 Influenza Prevention in Children: What Parents Need to Know
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Know Chocolates Better Dark Chocolate vs. Milk Chocolate vs. White Chocolate 

Most Popular on Medindia

Turmeric Powder - Health Benefits, Uses & Side Effects Diaphragmatic Hernia Selfie Addiction Calculator Daily Calorie Requirements Find a Doctor Drug Interaction Checker Indian Medical Journals Drug - Food Interactions Blood Donation - Recipients Nutam (400mg) (Piracetam)
This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use
×

Keep your Dogs Away from Easter Chocolates Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests