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Itís Not Only Sadness Even Happiness Can Trigger Broken Heart Syndrome

by Reshma Anand on March 3, 2016 at 12:39 PM
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Itís Not Only Sadness Even Happiness Can Trigger Broken Heart Syndrome

People who suffer sudden shock or extreme depression due to sad events such as a death of a loved one, separation or loss can develop a syndrome called as "Broken Heart Syndrome."

Broken heart syndrome is officially termed as Takotsubo Syndrome (TTS) that is characterized by ballooning of the lower part of the left ventricle. Though it is linked to sad events, a new study has found that the syndrome can also be triggered by happy or positive events.

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The study published in the European Heart Journal was conducted by a Cardiologist Dr. Jelena Ghadri along with her colleagues. They analyzed about 1750 patients with broken heart syndrome who registered in the TTS website from nine different countries.

Of the patients, researchers found that 485 patients suffered from the syndrome due to stressful events such as death, accident and sudden separation. But 20 patients had developed the syndrome due to positive events such as a birth of a grandchild, wedding, or a surprise celebration.
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Dr Jelena Ghadri, from University Hospital Zurich in Switzerland - where the world's first TTS registry is based, said, "We have shown that the triggers for TTS can be more varied than previously thought. A TTS patient is no longer the classic 'broken hearted' patient, and the disease can be preceded by positive emotions too."

The study also found that 95% of patients who suffered from broken heart syndrome were women. The problem is said to affect females predominantly.

"Clinicians should be aware of this and also consider that patients who arrive in the emergency department with signs of heart attacks, such as chest pain and breathlessness, but after a happy event or emotion, could be suffering from TTS just as much as a similar patient presenting after a negative emotional event," she added.

However, the study found that "broken heart syndrome" varied with the "happy heart syndrome". Usually, people with broken heart syndrome experience lower ventricle ballooning, but it was different in the people with the happy heart syndrome. These people experienced a ballooning of the mid ventricle than the lower ventricle type.

"Our findings broaden the clinical spectrum of TTS. They also suggest that happy and sad life events may share similar emotional pathways that can ultimately cause TTS," concluded the researchers.

Source: Medindia
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