About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Is Bipolar Disorder Linked to Parkinsonís Disease?

by Colleen Fleiss on May 24, 2019 at 9:15 AM
Font : A-A+

Is Bipolar Disorder Linked to Parkinsonís Disease?

People who have bipolar disorder may be at an increased risk to later develop Parkinson's disease than people who do not have bipolar disorder, revealed new study published in the online issue of Neurologyģ, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

"Previous studies have shown a relationship between depression and Parkinson's disease, but few studies have looked at whether there is a relationship between bipolar disorder and Parkinson's," said study author Mu-Hong Chen, MD, PhD, of Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan.

Advertisement

For the study, researchers examined a national Taiwanese health database for people were diagnosed with bipolar disorder between 2001 and 2009 and who had no history of Parkinson's disease, for a total of 56,340 people. They were matched with 225,360 people of the same age, sex and other factors who had never been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or Parkinson's disease as a control group. Then the two groups were followed until the end of 2011.

During the study, 372 of the people with bipolar disorder developed Parkinson's disease, or 0.7 percent, compared to 222 of those who did not have bipolar disorder, or 0.1 percent.
Advertisement

After adjusting for other factors that could affect the risk of developing Parkinson's disease, such as age, sex, use of antipsychotic medications, and medical issues such as traumatic brain injury and cerebrovascular diseases, people with bipolar disorder were nearly seven times as likely to develop Parkinson's disease as people who did not have bipolar disorder.

The people with bipolar disorder who developed Parkinson's disease did so at a younger age than the control group members who developed the disease--64 years old at diagnosis compared to 73 years old.

A total of 94 percent of those with bipolar disorder were hospitalized less than once per year; 3 percent were hospitalized one to two times per year; and 3 percent were hospitalized more than two times per year. Those who were hospitalized more than two times per year were six times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those who were hospitalized less than once per year. People who were hospitalized one to two times per year were four times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those who were hospitalized less than once per year.

"Further studies are needed to investigate whether these diseases share underlying processes or changes in the brain," Chen said. "These could include genetic alterations, inflammatory processes or problems with the transmission of messages between brain cells. If we could identify the underlying cause of this relationship, that could potentially help us develop treatments that could benefit both conditions."

A limitation of the study is it included only people who sought medical help for their bipolar disorder. Also, the database did not include information on family history of Parkinson's disease or environmental factors that could increase people's risk of developing the disease.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

Latest Mental Health News

 Traffic Noise Linked to Higher Risk of Suicide
: Living with a lot of transportation noise from road traffic and trains can increase your risk of death by suicide, after adjusting for exposure to air pollution and greenness.
Breaking the IQ Mold: How Americans' Unique Mental Abilities Transcend IQ Scores?
Americans exhibit high intelligence in one IQ category despite lower scores in others according to a new study.
Hope on the Horizon: European Study Reveals Significant Decrease in Suicides
New study confirms a drop in suicide rates across 15 European countries, while Turkey sees a significant increase.
Nightmares of Discrimination: Sleep Issues Plague LGBTQ+ Youth
Lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth experience sleep problems due to depression, stress, and family conflict.
Tuberculosis and Mental Health: Need for Extensive Care
Are mental health services important for tuberculosis treatment? Integrating mental health services into the Tuberculosis program can improve treatment completion.
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

Is Bipolar Disorder Linked to Parkinsonís Disease? Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests