by VR Sreeraman on  March 13, 2011 at 10:17 PM Drug News
 Indian Government Bans Six Drugs Over Safety Issues
Based on the recommendations of the Expert Committee constituted by DTAB, the Central Government has banned the use of six drugs with immediate effect, over safety issues.

The names of these drugs along with the brief reasons for their ban are furnished below:


1. Nimesulide formulations in children below 12 years of age - Nimesulide containing products are not permitted in many countries in children under 12 years of age. The drug has been considered to be hepatotoxic and children are considered more susceptible to hepatotoxicity.

2. Cisapride and its formulations for human use - Use of this drug is reported to be associated with increased risk of serious cardiac arrhythmia.

3. Phenylpropanolamine and its formulations for human use - Use of this drug is associated with risk of hypertensive episodes like cardiac congestive failures and hemorrhagic strokes.

4. Human Placental Extract and its formulations for human use - There is no clear evidence of efficacy of this drug in most of the conditions and there are safety concerns like transmission of blood borne infections, immunoreactions and unwanted exposure to hormones associated with its use.

5. Sibutramine and its formulations for human use - Use of this drug is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke.

6. R-Sibutramine and its formulations for human use - Use of this drug is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke.

Apart from the aforementioned six drugs banned recently, the following drugs have been banned during the last three years:

1. Rosiglitazone, on 12th November, 2010 - Use of this drug is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events such as congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction.

2. Rimonabant, on 11th December, 2009 - Use of this drug is associated with increased risk of psychiatric side effects.

3. Diclofenac and its formulations for animal use, on 4th July, 2008 - Extensive use of this drug in animals was leading to harmful effects on vultures. The vulture population was depleting as it was observed that vultures fed on carcass of animals treated with diclofenac were dying.

The decision to ban or withdraw a drug by the regulatory authorities is normally based on the risk assessment process, which is influenced by a number of factors such as disease pattern in a country, indications and dosages of the drug permitted, varying reactions of certain ethnic groups in a given population, availability of safer substitutes and overall safety profile of the drug. These conditions are different for different countries. It is for this reason that a drug banned / restricted in one country may continue to be marketed in other countries. There is a well laid out mechanism in India to review the status of the drug formulations as and when any serious adverse event is reported in the International journals, WHO Newsletters or when a drug formulation is reported to have been banned / withdrawn in some countries. The use of the drug, so reported, is assessed in consultation with the expert committees set up for the purpose, based on available technical information, benefit-risk ratio, local needs and availability of safer alternatives etc. The Central Government prohibit manufacture and sale of drugs in the country under Section 26A of the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940.

This information was given by Minister of Health & Family Welfare Shri. Ghulam Nabi Azad in reply to a question in the Lok Sabha today.

Source: PIB

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