About Careers MedBlog Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

In Patients With Severe PH, Higher BMI is Associated With Lower Mortality Risk

by Kathy Jones on May 20, 2014 at 8:29 PM
Font : A-A+

 In Patients With Severe PH, Higher BMI is Associated With Lower Mortality Risk

Previous research has suggested that in patients with congestive heart failure, obesity and a larger waist size have paradoxically been associated with a better prognosis.

This effect, known as the obesity paradox phenomenon, is now being demonstrated in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension.

Advertisement

"Obesity-related illnesses, particularly obesity hypoventilation syndrome and sleep apnea, may play a role in the development of pulmonary hypertension, and so we examined whether the protective effects of obesity seen in patients with heart failure were also seen in these patients," said researcher Jose Caceres, MD, of Jacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, NY. Pulmonary hypertension is high blood pressure in the arteries going to the lung.

"In our study of more than a thousand patients with significant pulmonary hypertension, we found that a higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a reduced mortality risk, even after adjustment for baseline characteristics," stated co-researcher M. Khalid Mojadidi, MD.
Advertisement

The study was presented at the 2014 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

The study involved 1137 patients with significant pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary artery systolic pressure > 60 mmHg), including 361 with a normal BMI (group A), 639 with obesity (Group B), and 137 with morbid obesity (Group C). One-year mortality rates were 34.1%, in Group A, 22.8% in Group B, and 12.4% in Group C, yielding a lower relative risk (RR) for one-year mortality in groups B (RR 0.616; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.484-0.530) and C (RR 0.306; 95% CI 0.184-0.508) compared to Group A. One-year readmission rates however did not significantly differ between groups. "An obesity paradox may also occur in patients with significant pulmonary hypertension," said lead author Dr. Ronald Zolty. "A possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon is increased levels of serum lipoproteins associated with increased body fat, which may play a role in neutralizing circulating toxins and inflammatory proteins."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

Latest Research News

Eight Threats to Black Adult's Longevity
Decoding the eight factors affecting Black adults' life expectancy.
Beyond the Campus: Contrasting Realities Revealed!
Sobering truth about foot travel in the United States emerges from international statistics, highlighting the prevalence of walking on the Blacksburg campus.
Astounding Link Between Darwin's Theory and Synaptic Plasticity  Discovered!
Unveiling a hidden mechanism, proteins within brain cells exhibit newfound abilities at synapses, reinforcing Darwin's theory of adaptation and diversity in the natural world.
Unlocking the Fountain of Youth: Exploring the Synergistic Power!
Combining micro-needling and cupping, two emerging and alternative techniques, in an experimental study reveals a potential synergy for skin rejuvenation.
Imminent Threat of the Next Pandemic - Disease X
Despite a decline in COVID-19 cases, the World Health Organisation (WHO) raises global concerns by warning of an "inevitable" next pandemic known as "Disease X".
View All
This site uses cookies to deliver our services.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use  Ok, Got it. Close
×

In Patients With Severe PH, Higher BMI is Associated With Lower Mortality Risk Personalised Printable Document (PDF)

Please complete this form and we'll send you a personalised information that is requested

You may use this for your own reference or forward it to your friends.

Please use the information prudently. If you are not a medical doctor please remember to consult your healthcare provider as this information is not a substitute for professional advice.

Name *

Email Address *

Country *

Areas of Interests