Improving Academic Training in Human Nutrition is Necessary to Fight Malnutrition

by Dr. Trupti Shirole on  February 25, 2017 at 4:31 AM Diet & Nutrition News
RSS Email Print This Page Comment bookmark
Font : A-A+

The criteria and guiding concepts to be applied in the academic training of human nutrition have been identified in a recent study published in Frontiers in Nutrition.
 Improving Academic Training in Human Nutrition is Necessary to Fight Malnutrition
Improving Academic Training in Human Nutrition is Necessary to Fight Malnutrition

This is the first attempt to more clearly define the cultural identity of human nutrition in both an academic and professional orientated perspective. In total, three domains of human nutrition were identified: Basic Nutrition, Applied Nutrition, and Clinical Nutrition.

"Take obesity as an example, it is still frequently not recognized as a disease state, the issue of undernutrition in elderly and obese individuals is therefore largely overlooked," says Muscaritoli.

The scientists argue that the biological significance of food in the collective imagination has been lost in favor of its hedonistic aspects. People only look at nutrients as a number, but not as something with nutritional value. They do not consider the food matrix nor biological function.

Basic Nutrition is the discipline that deals with the scientific basis of human nutrition. This domain studies and characterizes the presence, bioavailability, mechanisms, and biochemical-physiological roles of nutrients and bioactive molecules.

Applied Nutrition, on the other hand, deals with the relationship between nutrition and the health and well-being of a population. This domain, for example, concentrates on improving the nutritional qualities of foods and envisions guidelines for healthy eating.

Lastly, the domain of Clinical Nutrition focuses on assessing, preventing, diagnosing, and treating malnutrition.

"The three domains have their own cultural and scientific identity corresponding to specific professional skills, but they should all be integrated in the academic training," says Muscaritoli. To that extent, the team identified the subject matter to be covered in such a nutrition curriculum.

With this set of criteria and guiding concepts, the scientists make a first attempt to improve the academic training in human nutrition.

"We hope this will lead to a better integration of the available knowledge on human nutrition in the daily practice of healthcare professionals - and turn the tide of the current cultural confusion of the nutritional scenario," explains Muscaritoli, who is also Specialty Chief Editor of Clinical Nutrition, in Frontiers in Nutrition.

Source: Eurekalert

Post a Comment

Comments should be on the topic and should not be abusive. The editorial team reserves the right to review and moderate the comments posted on the site.
Notify me when reply is posted
I agree to the terms and conditions
Advertisement

Recommended Reading

More News on:

The Cabbage Diet Zone Diet The Macrobiotic Diet Why Do We Eat - Nutrition Facts Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Magical Millets for Your Health Malnutrition to Obesity - The Big Leap Dietary Doís and Doníts of Ayurveda Nutrition IQ Health Benefits of Eating Asparagus 

News A - Z

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

News Search

Medindia Newsletters

Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!

Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

Find a Doctor

Stay Connected

  • Available on the Android Market
  • Available on the App Store

News Category

News Archive