About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Hysterectomies Could Carry Long-Term Risks Of Urinary Incontinence

by Medindia Content Team on October 26, 2007 at 4:06 PM
Font : A-A+

Hysterectomies Could Carry Long-Term Risks Of Urinary Incontinence

According to a recent Swedish study, urinary incontinence that requires corrective surgery later on, is positively linked to hysterectomies.

The findings of the study, which spanned over thirty years, give that this risk was especially high for women who have given birth to more than one child, vaginally.

Advertisement

"Women should be counseled about associated long-term risks related to hysterectomy, and other therapeutic options should be considered before radical methods of treatment," the report published in The Lancet reads.

Hysterectomy encompasses the removal of the uterus, or womb, and it may be partial or complete. It is carried out to remove cancers of the reproductive system, postmenopausal bleeding, collapse of the uterus or uterine prolapse, as well as some other disorders.
Advertisement

Now touted as a definitive cure to such disorders, the hysterectomy has become quite common. One in five British women will have undergone a hysterectomy by age 55.

In the United States, each year 600,000 hysterectomies are undertaken. Of this 90 percent are done for benign reasons, or non-cancer and other non-life-threatening conditions.

Between 1973 and 2003, researchers in Sweden tracked 165,260 women who had undergone hysterectomies and compared them to 479,506 other women who had not had the procedure.

They found the risk of undergoing stress urinary incontinence surgery (SUIS) was a significant 2.4 times higher in the hysterectomy group than the control group.

"The highest overall risk was within five years of hysterectomy, when patients in the exposed group were 2.7 times more likely than those in the unexposed group to require SUIS. The lowest risk was seen in patients more than 10 years after hysterectomy, when the risk was 2.1 times higher for exposed patients," the researchers write.

It was seen that the worst were women who had had four or more vaginal births; they faced a 16-fold higher risk of undergoing SUIS. The authors believe hysterectomies may interfere with the complex workings of the urethra, the tube connecting the urinary bladder to the outside of the body.

"The most biologically plausible rationale for this association is surgical trauma caused when the uterus and cervix are severed from pelvic-floor supportive tissues at the time of hysterectomy.

"Hysterectomy could interfere with the intricate urethral sphincter mechanism ... it might also result in changes of urethral and bladder neck support", the researchers write.

Source: Medindia
ANN/V
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Prolapse of Uterus Stress Incontinence Stress Incontinence - Management Diaper Rash Interstitial Cystitis Urinary Incontinence Urinary System Urinary Incontinence - Symptom Evaluation 

Recommended Reading
Prolapse of Uterus
Uterine Prolapse or prolapse of the uterus is a condition when a woman's uterus (womb) sags or ......
Diaper Rash
Diaper rash is an inflammatory skin condition that occurs in the diaper areas and commonly seen in t...
Interstitial Cystitis
Interstitial cystistis is an umbrella term where a pathology cannot be defined but the patient suf...
Stress Incontinence
Stress incontinence is the most common type of urinary incontinence. Women are more prone to it than...
Stress Incontinence - Management
Encyclopedia section of Medindia explaining about the various tests done for stress incontinence...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use