About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Humans Cannot Accurately Predict Their Emotions After A Decision

by VR Sreeraman on August 18, 2007 at 5:29 PM
Font : A-A+

Humans Cannot Accurately Predict Their Emotions After A Decision

A new study has found that humans are poor at predicting their emotions after decision-making.

Behavioral research over the past 15 years has shown that after taking a decision, people tend to anticipate that they may regret their choices.

Advertisement

The new study, by the University College London researchers, has answered how accurate are people in their anticipations of regret and of other post-decisional emotions, such as disappointment.

In the first of two experiments, the researchers made the participants take part in a two-person negotiation for money that would allow the researchers to observe negotiation style as well as measure how much regret the participants would feel if their tactics failed.
Advertisement

The team found that participants across the board tended to over-predict their post-negotiation regret and disappointment if their transaction was rejected. However, those who negotiated reasonably (i.e., less aggressive or "greedy") were less prone to experience regret than the latter, as they had provided sensible offers.

In the second experiment, participants who had just completed a course assignment were asked to predict how they would feel if the grades that they received for their assignments exceeded, matched, or were lower than their expectations. On average, participants received higher than expected grades. However, the researchers found that participants over-predicted the rejoicing and somewhat under-predicted the regret that they experienced when they received the grades.

In the light of such misprediction of emotions, Nick Sevdalis and Nigel Harvey, who authored the study, argue that when people make decisions they should perhaps discount the regret, rejoicing, and other post-decisional emotions that they anticipate will be associated with potential outcomes arising from those decisions.

The study is published in the August issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Source: ANI
LIN/B
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Advertisement
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Memory Loss - Can it be Recovered?
International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021 - Fighting for Rights in the Post-COVID Era
Effect of Blood Group Type on COVID-19 Risk and Severity
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Is Your Man Moody? 

Recommended Reading
Adolescents’ Emotional Skills Gets Boosted by Theatre Programmes
A new study has found that adolescents' emotional skills may be strengthened through a high school ....
Is Your Man Moody?
Women get confused by the behavior of men in their lives. It is time they realize that men too have ...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use