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Human Brain Responds to Aggressive Sounds More Quickly: Study

by Iswarya on December 10, 2018 at 9:58 AM

Human Brain Responds to Aggressive Sounds More Quickly: Study
Human brains notice aggressive or threatening voices much quicker than those that sound normal or happy, reports a new study. The findings of the study are published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

The study demonstrated that in a few hundred milliseconds, our brain becomes sensitive to the presence of angry voices.
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Sight and hearing are the two senses that allow human beings to detect threatening situations.

"We are interested in how fast our attention responds to the different intonations of the voices around us and how our brain deals with potentially threatening situations," said Nicolas Burra, the researcher from the University of Geneva in Switzerland.
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The researchers presented 22 short human voice sounds (600 milliseconds) that were neutral utterances or expressed either anger or joy to a small group of people while an electroencephalogram (EEG) diagnostic test measured electrical activity in the brain down to the millisecond.

The findings revealed that when the brain perceives an emotional target sound, N2ac activity is triggered after 200 milliseconds.

However, when it perceives anger, the N2ac intensifies and lasts longer, which is not the case for joy.

N2ac is a component related to the focusing of attention within an auditory scene.

Also, LPCpc activity a cerebral marker of auditory attention -- is also stronger for angry than for happy voices, findings revealed.

This rapid detection of the source of a potential threat in a complex environment is essential as it is "critical in crisis situations and a great advantage for our survival," noted Leonardo Ceravolo, a researcher from the varsity.

Source: IANS
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