About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Human Brain Capable of Tracking Eight Moving Objects at a Time

by Medindia Content Team on November 3, 2007 at 4:56 PM
Font : A-A+

Human Brain Capable of Tracking Eight Moving Objects at a Time

Vision researchers in the US have found that the human brain can keep track of the positions of eight moving objects at once.

The new finding is based on a study wherein the researchers showed volunteers a screen with many moving dots, and indicated which ones the subjects should focus on.

Advertisement

Previous studies had shown that the brain could accurately track the position of up to four dots.

"The magical number was thought to be four," New Scientist magazine quoted Steven Franconeri at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, as saying.
Advertisement

However, Franconeri and his colleague George Alvarez at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts believe that people can do much better at this task, depending upon the speed at which the dots moved.

A dozen students were recruited for the study, and were asked to track a specific number of the 16 moving dots appearing on the computer screen before them. Unlike in previous experiments, the dots came close to one another but did not touch. The researchers found that the subjects could accurately follow eight dots over the course of a minute, when the dots on the screen half a metre away moved relatively slowly, about 0.01 metres per second.

Franconeri said that the participants could not keep track of more than eight objects at once, even when they moved at a glacial pace. "At one point you reach the limit of the number of independent locations you can monitor at once," he said. As the researchers sped up the movement of the dots on the screen, the number of dots that people could follow dropped precipitously, with the subjects tracking only one dot once when the screen moved at a rate of 0.15 metres per second.

Franconeri believes that the finding that a person can track only one or two objects when they move at high speeds may have implications for the design of video games, and technologies to visualise air traffic control in which people have to follow numerous objects at once.

Source: ANI
LIN/V
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
First-Ever Successful Pig-To-Human Kidney Transplantation
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Parkinsons Disease Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ) 

Recommended Reading
New Study Shows on How Brain Processes Visual Information
While it has for long been believed that vision is processed in the brain along circuits made up of ...
Same Brain Area Processes Sight and Sound
The processing of auditory and visual information by the same brain area...
Study Identifies How the Brain Works in Creative People
Brain activity, even at rest, in people who tend to solve problems with a sudden creative insight, ....
Ataxia
Ataxia affects coordination. Gait becomes unstable and the patient loses balance. The cerebellum or ...
Language Areas in The Brain
The mechanism of how human brain processes the language to express and comprehend the verbal, writte...
Parkinsons Disease
Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease caused by progressive dopamine brain cells loss. ...
Ways to Improve your Intelligence Quotient (IQ)
Intelligence quotient (IQ) is a psychological measure of human intelligence. Regular physical and me...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use