About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

HPV Vaccine Protects From Infection Even After 10 Years

by Julia Samuel on November 30, 2017 at 1:45 PM
Font : A-A+

HPV Vaccine Protects From Infection Even After 10 Years

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine is safe and effective long-term in protecting against the most virulent strains of the virus.

The findings of a recent research support more widespread and early administration of the HPV vaccine before preadolescents and adolescents are exposed to the nation's most common sexually transmitted infection and the most common cause of cervical cancer.

Advertisement


Some 79 million Americans, most in their late teens and early 20s, are infected with human papillomavirus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About half of those are infected with the most virulent strains of the virus, which are targeted by the quadrivalent vaccine given to study participants.

"The vaccine was virtually 100 percent effective in preventing disease in these young individuals," says Dr. Daron G. Ferris, professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Medical College of Georgia and at the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University.
Advertisement

HPV Vaccine

The quadrivalent vaccine protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. Types 16 and 18 account for essentially all cervical cancer and for most other HPV-related cancers like penile and anal cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute. Types 6 and 11 account for about 90 percent of genital warts as well as non-cancerous tumor growths in the respiratory tract.

No cases of disease related to these four HPV types were found in study participants, who received a three-dose regimen of the vaccine when they were ages 9-15 and sexually inactive, Ferris says.

Ferris, first author of the new study who led trials of the quadrivalent vaccine in 2002, says the earlier, shorter-term evaluation clearly indicated the vaccine worked.

"We also needed to look at long-term efficacy, safety and immunogenicity," he says. "We needed to answer questions like if we vaccinate earlier in life, will it last. The answer is yes, this cancer prevention vaccine is working incredibly well 10 years later. A booster vaccine likely will not be needed by these young people. I think now we have come full circle."

The study was the longest follow up to date on the vaccine. Follow-up data on safety and efficacy has been assessed at up to six years in women age 15-26 and the current team of investigators also looked at data on the large cohort of young people two years ago.

Participants were followed at 34 sites in nine countries, including MCG and the Georgia Cancer Center in Augusta. Initially about one third of the 1,661 study participants received placebo, however the placebo group also received the vaccine 30 months into the study so those individuals were followed a shorter period of time, the researchers note.

While all participants remained disease free, the earlier vaccinations produced the most robust initial and long-term antibody response, Ferris says, of levels of the infection fighters that can be measured in the blood.

While about two-thirds of infected individuals can eventually clear the virus, it persists and can cause a wide range of health problems in the remainder, Ferris says. The vaccination is designed to better arm everyone's immune system to eliminate the virus.

The Food and Drug Administration approved the first quadrivalent vaccine, Gardasil, in June 2006. The vaccine is currently approved for patients ages 9-26.

Effectiveness assessments included looking for genital warts, precancerous and cancerous growths on the cervix and genitals as well as persistent HPV infections. Effectiveness evaluation began at 3.5 years and continued twice yearly during the 10-year-period.

Two-dose vaccines that cover nine HPV strains are rapidly replacing the three-dose quadrivalent vaccine, Ferris says.

About 43 percent of U.S. teens are up to date on recommended doses of the HPV vaccine, according to the CDC. The HPV vaccine can be given along with the meningococcal and tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccines, to 11- and 12-year-olds, the researchers note.

Study participants reported sexual activity rates similar to other studies and numbers of new sexual partners were higher among males than females. Other sexually transmitted diseases, including gonorrhea and chlamydia, were found in a small percentage of study participants over the years of follow up. Half of all sexually transmitted diseases occur in people age 15-24 and 1 in 4 sexually adolescent females have a sexually transmitted disease like chlamydia or HPV, according to the CDC.

Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Printed Temperature Sensors help with Continuous Temperature Monitoring
Health Benefits of Giloy
Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021 - It's time to RISE
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Cervical Cancer Flu Uterine Cancer Anal Warts Vaccination for Children Top 10 Vaccine Myths Debunked Human Papillomavirus Infection 

Recommended Reading
HPV Vaccine Dose Reduced to Two Shots for Cervical Cancer : CDC Recommends
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two dose -HPV vaccine schedule for preventing ...
Cervical Screening Will Only be Needed Three Times With HPV Vaccine
Now with the HPV vaccine, screening will only be needed three times in women. The new programme ......
New HPV Vaccine Reduces The Risk Of HPV-Related Diseases
A new improved Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine called 9vHPV has been developed greatly reduces .....
HPV Vaccine to Prevent Cervical Cancer - New Insights
HPV vaccine - A safe and effective treatment in prevention of cervical cancer....
Anal Warts
Anal warts or genital warts are soft bumps caused by Human Papilloma Virus and are a sexually transm...
Cervical Cancer
Cancer cervix refers to cancerous growth in the cervix and usually occurs in the transition called ...
Human Papillomavirus Infection
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, depending on the human papillomavirus that causes it, can resu...
Top 10 Vaccine Myths Debunked
Childhood vaccination has saved many lives, yet lots more has to be done to increase awareness and e...
Uterine Cancer
Uterine Cancer or Cancer of the Uterus (or Endometrial Cancer) refer to cancers affecting the uterus...
Vaccination for Children
Vaccines are biological products that impart immunity to the recipient. Vaccines may be live attenua...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use