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How Did Peaches Geldof Survive Drug Overdose?

by Hannah Punitha on July 22, 2008 at 4:33 PM
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 How Did Peaches Geldof Survive Drug Overdose?

British socialite Peaches Geldof would not have been alive today had it not been for the timely action of her friend, who saved her from an alleged drug overdose.

As per reports, Peaches ceased to breathe for several minutes and would have died or suffered brain damage had her friend not given her mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and chest compressions to keep oxygen pumping to her brain.

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When the emergency crew finally got to her flat on July 20 afternoon, they found the 19-year-old unconscious.

The part-time TV presenter was successfully revived at her flat in trendy Camden, North London, though she was very terrified and began sobbing hysterically.
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She then refused to be admitted to the hospital for fear her rock legend dad, organiser of the Live Aid charity concerts, would find out.

Sir Bob Geldof, 56, had in the past said that he would go "ballistic" if Peaches ever turned to drugs.

"Peaches could not breathe for several minutes after suffering a respiratory arrest. Her friend had to give chest pumps and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation," the Sun quoted a source as saying.

"If she had not received this she could have died or she could have suffered brain damage. Peaches had gone into respiratory arrest, in which a patient's breathing stops but the heart doesn't.

"It was extremely serious and there is no doubt her friend saved her life," the source said.

"No one could believe this has happened to Sir Bob Geldof's daughter, particularly considering what happened to her mother," another source added.

Amazingly when she regained consciousness, Peaches shouted at the paramedics who helped her.

The source added: "When she came too she started mouthing off and told the ambulance crew, 'You have to respect my privacy'. She then told them to get out.

"And she refused to go hospital to have further treatment because she was worried about it getting out."

London Ambulance confirmed its crews attended the scene.

A spokeswoman said: "We were called shortly before 4:45pm yesterday (Sunday) to an address in London N1, to reports of a female patient taken ill.

"We sent an ambulance, a bicycle responder and a fast response car to the scene.

"Following assessment, the patient did not need hospital treatment."

Source: ANI
SPH
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