Hormonal Birth Control Does Not Increase Depression Risk in Women

by Colleen Fleiss on  February 27, 2018 at 1:19 AM Women Health News
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New study conducted by Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center researchers finds no link between hormonal contraceptives and depression.
Hormonal Birth Control Does Not Increase Depression Risk in Women
Hormonal Birth Control Does Not Increase Depression Risk in Women

"Depression is a concern for a lot of women when they're starting hormonal contraception, particularly when they're using specific types that have progesterone," said Dr. Brett Worly, lead author of the study and OB/GYN at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. "Based on our findings, this side effect shouldn't be a concern for most women, and they should feel comfortable knowing they're making a safe choice."

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Worly and his team reviewed thousands of studies on the mental health effects of contraceptives. They included data tied to various contraception methods, including injections, implants and pills. Similarly, researchers reviewed studies examining the effects of hormonal birth control on postpartum women, adolescents and women with a history of depression, all with the same conclusion: there is insufficient evidence to prove a link between birth control and depression.

"For those patients, it's important that they have a good relationship with their healthcare provider so they can get the appropriate screening done - regardless of the medications they're on," said Worly.

Worly said patient concerns are valid, and he wants women to continue having open and honest discussions with their doctor about which options work for them.

"We live in a media-savvy age where if one or a few people have severe side effects, all of a sudden, that gets amplified to every single person," he said. "The biggest misconception is that birth control leads to depression. For most patients that's just not the case."

Most women have tried at least one method of contraception in their lives, with nearly 37 million women in the United States currently using birth control. Sixty-seven percent of current users have opted for a non-permanent hormonal method such as an oral pill, but among those, 30 percent have discontinued their use due to dissatisfaction with potential side effects.

Source: Eurekalert

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