About My Health Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Advertisement

Higher Male-to-female Hormone Ratio Poses Greater Risk for Heart Disease

by Anjali Aryamvally on May 29, 2018 at 8:07 PM
Font : A-A+

Higher Male-to-female Hormone Ratio Poses Greater Risk for Heart Disease

Higher blood level of a male hormone (testosterone) and a higher ratio of the male-type to-female type (estrogen) is associated with a higher risk of heart disease in post-menopausal women. The study is published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The risk for cardiovascular disease is much lower in women than men until women reach the age of 50 years of age, then risk rises dramatically after menopause. Previous studies have demonstrated that higher androgen and lower estrogen levels are associated with risk factors for heart disease in post-menopausal women; however, other studies show conflicting results, so the relationship between sex hormones and cardiovascular events in post-menopausal women remains unclear.

Advertisement


In this study, which is one of the largest and among the longest follow up of studies of this kind, researchers used data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) to evaluate the association of sex hormone levels with incident cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and heart failure over a 12-year follow-up in 2,834 post-menopausal women free of cardiovascular disease at baseline.

Sex hormone concentrations were measured using fasting serum samples. Every nine-12 months, participants or their next of kin were interviewed over the telephone regarding hospital admissions, outpatient cardiovascular diagnoses and procedures, and death. Hospital records were obtained for 98 percent of reported hospitalized cardiovascular disease events and some medical record-based information was obtained for 95 percent of outpatient encounters.
Advertisement

A higher testosterone to estradiol ratio was associated with an elevated risk for incident cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and heart failure. Higher total testosterone was associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease and total cardiovascular disease (defined as coronary disease plus stroke events), while higher estradiol levels were associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease. Additionally, the risk for cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease were approximately linear across the range of total testosterone, testosterone to estradiol ratio and estradiol levels, but there was a U-shaped associated between testosterone to estradiol ratio and heart failure with the extreme ends at a higher risk for heart failure.

"Although sex hormone levels may be linked to future cardiovascular events, it is unclear what the best intervention is to modify sex hormone levels for risk reduction," said Erin D. Michos, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and senior author on the study. "However, a sex hormone profile higher in male hormones may identify a woman at higher risk for cardiovascular disease who may benefit from other risk reduction strategies."

In an accompanying editorial comment, Virginia M. Miller, PhD professor of physiology and surgery and director of the Mayo Clinic Women's Health Research Center writes that while this study provides new insight into relationships and endogenous hormones and cardiovascular events, more research is needs to better understand the "complex hormonal environment affecting cellular and organ functions involved in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease in women as they age."

Miller said, "Defining cardiovascular risk for women should account for individualized profiles of genetic variants in enzymes associated with steroid metabolism, uptake and receptors in conjunction with risk for specific cardiovascular pathologies. This approach is precision medicine."



Source: Eurekalert
Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
News Category
What's New on Medindia
Health Benefits of Sea Buckthorn
Contraceptive Pills in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Curtail Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Mushroom May Help Cut Down the Odds of Developing Depression
View all

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Cardiac Catheterization Heart Attack Air travel: To fly or not to fly Diet Lifestyle and Heart Disease Body Mass Index Silent Killer Diseases Heart Healthy Heart Lifestyle Paths to Prevent Heart Disease Statins 

Recommended Reading
South Asian-Americans at Higher Risk for Heart Disease, Stroke: Study
Asians are at a lower risk for heart disease and stroke. However, South Asians living in the U.S ......
Eating Nuts Can Lower Diabetes and Heart Disease Risk
Eating nuts can reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Consuming two ounces of nuts a day .....
Prescribed Medication Along With PCI Better Treatment for Heart Disease Patients
International clinical trials suggest that prescribed medication along with percutaneous coronary .....
PCSK9 Inhibitors for Lowering Cholesterol May Reduce Heart Disease Risk
PCSK9 inhibitors used in lowering LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) may reduce heart disease risk. ....
Air travel: To fly or not to fly
Air travel is for everyone, even those with medical conditions....
Body Mass Index
Body mass index (BMI) is a simple tool that is generally used to estimate the total amount of body f...
Cardiac Catheterization
Cardiac catheterization is a radiological procedure for both diagnosis and treatment of heart condit...
Heart Attack
Heart attack is the death of the heart muscle due to loss of blood supply. Heart disease is the lead...
Lifestyle Paths to Prevent Heart Disease
Heart disease can be of many types depending upon whether they involve the heart muscles or artery w...
Statins
Statins are new wonder drugs that are proving to be efficacious, not merely in relieving symptoms bu...

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2021

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use