About Careers Internship MedBlogs Contact us
Medindia LOGIN REGISTER
Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia
Advertisement

Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia

Font : A-A+

Highlights:

  • Body height in young men linked to dementia at old age
  • Taller men are at a lower risk of developing dementia in old age
  • However, dementia risk increases in shorter men later in life

Men who are taller at young age are at a lower risk of developing dementia in old age, reveals a new study published in eLife.

Details of the Study

Advertisement


Finding ways to identify individuals at risk of dementia is essential. It can help people take preventive measures or plan for their future care. The study, originally posted on bioRxiv, indicates that young adult height might be one potential risk factor to consider.

Previous studies have suggested that height may be a risk factor for dementia, but much of this research was not able to take into account genetic, environmental, or other early-life factors that may be linked to both height and dementia.
Advertisement

"We wanted to see if body height in young men is associated with diagnosis of dementia, while exploring whether intelligence test scores, educational level, and underlying environmental and genetic factors shared by brothers explain the relationship," says lead author Terese Sara Høj Jørgensen, Assistant Professor at the Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, in Denmark.

Results of the Study

To do this, Jørgensen and her colleagues analysed data on 666,333 Danish men born between 1939 and 1959, including 70,608 brothers and 7,388 twins, from Danish national registries. They found a total of 10,599 men who developed dementia later in life.

Their adjusted analysis of this group showed that there was about a 10% reduction in the risk of developing dementia for about every 6cm of height in individuals above the average height. When the team took into account the potential role of intelligence or education, the unadjusted relationship between height and dementia risk was only slightly reduced.

They found that the relationship between height and dementia also existed when they looked at brothers with different heights, suggesting that genetics and family characteristics alone do not explain why shorter men had a greater dementia risk. This was also true when they studied data concerning twins, although the results for this group were less certain.

"A key strength of our study is that it adjusted for the potential role of education and intelligence in young men's dementia risk, both of which may build up cognitive reserve and make this group less vulnerable to developing dementia," explains senior author Merete Osler, Professor at the Center for Clinical Research and Prevention, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, and at the University of Copenhagen.

'Cognitive reserve' refers to the brain's ability to improvise and solve problems that come up in everyday life. Osler says that adjusting for education and intelligence reduces the likelihood that the relationship between height and dementia is really explained by cognitive reserve.

"Together, our results point to an association between taller body height in young men and a lower risk of dementia diagnosis later in life, which persists even when adjusted for educational level and intelligence test scores," Osler says. "Our analysis of the data concerning brothers confirms these findings, and suggests the association may have common roots in early-life environmental exposures that are not related to family factors shared by brothers."

She adds that an important limitation of the study is the uncertainty as to whether these findings are generalizable to women, as previous studies on potential gender differences in the relationship between height and dementia are mostly inconclusive.



Source: Eurekalert

Citations   close

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

  • APA

    Hannah Joy. (2020, February 12). Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia. Medindia. Retrieved on Jun 28, 2022 from https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/taller-young-men-may-have-lower-risk-of-dementia-193119-1.htm.

  • MLA

    Hannah Joy. "Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia". Medindia. Jun 28, 2022. <https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/taller-young-men-may-have-lower-risk-of-dementia-193119-1.htm>.

  • Chicago

    Hannah Joy. "Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia". Medindia. https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/taller-young-men-may-have-lower-risk-of-dementia-193119-1.htm. (accessed Jun 28, 2022).

  • Harvard

    Hannah Joy. 2021. Taller Young Men may Have Lower Risk of Dementia. Medindia, viewed Jun 28, 2022, https://www.medindia.net/news/healthwatch/taller-young-men-may-have-lower-risk-of-dementia-193119-1.htm.

Advertisement

Advertisement
News A-Z
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
What's New on Medindia
Vaccination  And Counter  Measures Against  Monkeypox
Indian Railways Special Concession on Health Grounds
COVID Toes
View all
Recommended Reading
News Archive
Date
Category
Advertisement
News Category

Medindia Newsletters Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!
Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy.

More News on:
Alzheimers Disease Dementia Vascular Dementia 

Most Popular on Medindia

The Essence of Yoga Loram (2 mg) (Lorazepam) Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Blood Donation - Recipients Noscaphene (Noscapine) Diaphragmatic Hernia Calculate Ideal Weight for Infants Iron Intake Calculator Find a Hospital Post-Nasal Drip

Disclaimer - All information and content on this site are for information and educational purposes only. The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. Always seek the advice of a qualified physician for medical diagnosis and treatment. Full Disclaimer

© All Rights Reserved 1997 - 2022

This site uses cookies to deliver our services. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy, and our Terms of Use