Over 20 Million Children Worldwide Missed Out on Lifesaving Vaccines in 2018

Over 20 Million Children Worldwide Missed Out on Lifesaving Vaccines in 2018

by Adeline Dorcas on  July 16, 2019 at 4:04 PM Health Watch
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Highlights:
  • Vaccines play a key role in preventing outbreaks and keeping the world safe
  • Most children are being vaccinated, however, many are still left behind
  • New data from WHO and UNICEF reports that nearly 20 million children worldwide missed out on lifesaving measles, diphtheria, and tetanus vaccines in 2018
Nearly 20 million children worldwide do not have adequate access to potentially life-saving treatment and care against life-threatening diseases such as measles, diphtheria, and tetanus.
Over 20 Million Children Worldwide Missed Out on Lifesaving Vaccines in 2018

Almost 20 million children worldwide - more than 1 in 10 - missed out on lifesaving vaccines such as measles, diphtheria, and tetanus in 2018, according to new data from WHO and UNICEF.

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Globally, since 2010, vaccination coverage with three doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP3) and one dose of the measles vaccine has stalled at around 86 percent. While high, this is not sufficient. 95 percent coverage is needed - globally, across countries, and communities - to protect against outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases.

"Vaccines are one of our most important tools for preventing outbreaks and keeping the world safe," said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization. "While most children today are being vaccinated, far too many are left behind. Unacceptably, it's often those who are most at risk- the poorest, the most marginalized, those touched by conflict or forced from their homes - who are persistently missed."

Most unvaccinated children live in the poorest countries, and are disproportionately in fragile or conflict-affected states. Almost half are in just 16 countries - Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Haiti, Iraq, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

If these children do get sick, they are at risk of the severest health consequences, and least likely to access lifesaving treatment and care.

Measles outbreaks reveal entrenched gaps in coverage, often over many years

Stark disparities in vaccine access persist across and within countries of all income levels. This has resulted in devastating measles outbreaks in many parts of the world - including countries that have high overall vaccination rates.

In 2018, almost 350,000 measles cases were reported globally, more than doubling from 2017.

"Measles is a real-time indicator of where we have more work to do to fight preventable diseases," said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF's Executive Director. "Because measles is so contagious, an outbreak points to communities that are missing out on vaccines due to access, costs or, in some places, complacency. We have to exhaust every effort to immunize every child."

Ten countries with highest reported incidence rate of measles cases (2018)

Coverage with measles first dose (2010)

Coverage with measles first dose (2018)

1. Ukraine

56

91

2. Democratic Republic of the Congo

74

80

3. Madagascar

66

62

4. Liberia

65

91

5. Somalia

46

46

6. Serbia

95

92

7. Georgia

94

98

8. Albania

99

96

9. Yemen

68

64

10. Romania

95

90

Ukraine leads a varied list of countries with the highest reported incidence rate of measles in 2018. While the country has now managed to vaccinate over 90 percent of its infants, coverage had been low for several years, leaving a large number of older children and adults at risk.

Several other countries with high incidence and high coverage have significant groups of people who have missed the measles vaccine in the past. This shows how low coverage over time or discrete communities of unvaccinated people can spark deadly outbreaks.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage data available for the first time

For the first time, there is also data on the coverage of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which protects girls against cervical cancer later in life. As of 2018, 90 countries - home to 1 in 3 girls worldwide - had introduced the HPV vaccine into their national programs. Just 13 of these are lower-income countries. This leaves those most at risk of the devastating impacts of cervical cancer still least likely to have access to the vaccine.

Together with partners like Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, WHO and UNICEF are supporting countries to strengthen their immunization systems and outbreak response, including by vaccinating all children with routine immunization, conducting emergency campaigns, and training and equipping health workers as an essential part of quality primary healthcare.

Source: Newswise

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